The University of Alberta? - page 5

by Dezy

9,653 Unique Views | 49 Comments

Is there anyone else out there that will be going to this program in the fall or that is already going there? I'm so grateful for finally having gotten into this program but now I'm a little concerned. The U of A is a huge... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from helterskelter22
    CodeteamB, to be honest I think you're in outlier in terms of success within the program. I've never heard anyone talk in such positive light about it. My biggest gripe with the program inst CBL it's just the mass scale disorganization and lack of communication. In terms of preparedness I think this program does a great disservice to those of us who have paid thousands of dollars and invested countless hours to attend.

    Like others have said if you're willing to endure two years of strife and grief then go for it. At the end we all come out as RN's but what the point of that if your foundational knowledge is so weak that you're constantly in worry about harming a patient?
    Perhaps... But give yourself a couple years working and see, you may surprise yourself. What knowledge do you feel you are lacking? A lot of nursing is learned on the job, and if you have the motivation and the resources to continue your learning you will be ok. I think that the worry you feel indicates that you know that you don't know everything, and that's a good thing in a new grad! Confidence and expertise come with experience, they are not learned in the classroom or even in clinical.

    ( this post not to talk up u of a, rather hoping to give you a little hope. Good luck!)
  2. 1
    Now see this part of CBL is what would worry me: the PBL at McMaster works with every person in the group researching EVERYTHING and then discussing and sharing at seminar. So if you were weak in one area or missed something, someone else would pick it up. I would think it would be hard to learn everything if you only have to research a portion of the problem. You are then relying on other colleagues to fill in those gaps in appropriate detail and learn it on the spot then instead of having time to process it from the research.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  3. 0
    Quote from Pink Tulip
    Now see this part of CBL is what would worry me: the PBL at McMaster works with every person in the group researching EVERYTHING and then discussing and sharing at seminar. So if you were weak in one area or missed something, someone else would pick it up. I would think it would be hard to learn everything if you only have to research a portion of the problem. You are then relying on other colleagues to fill in those gaps in appropriate detail and learn it on the spot then instead of having time to process it from the research.
    Yup. You hit the nail on the head. To succeed in this program I think you do need to research everything, and that is overwhelming for some students. The most successful seminar I had was in our final year when we had all found our groove. We would complete our research handouts and email them to our classmates by 8 PM the day before seminar and the expectation was that you would read everyone's research before seminar. Then we would have a discussion on each topic. Believe me, if I was assigned Watson's nursing model for a scenario (gag) I was still doing all the reading on the patho, pharm, treatment, etc because the info I needed on those subjects was not going to be in my friends two-page handout, no matter how high quality it was, that then meant when we discussed I had something meaningful to contribute. That's why CBL requires a high degree of self direction, you can't just do exactly what is required by the syllabus.

    I don't know how exactly that would compare to your experience with PBL.
  4. 0
    That would sound more accurate. I feel if I went this route I would just do the research myself anyways - I do terrible with notes. I need the little extra details to remember and put everything into context.

    What part of the disorganized management was really disheartening for students? I know lots of University admins that are incompetent at scheduling, but does this affect your clinicals?
  5. 0
    Can't really speak to that, I vaguely remember some complaints to that effect from other students but I had no problems personally and can't remember any specifics.
  6. 0
    is the uofa really as bad as people say it is? can anyone from the 4 year degree speak for it?
  7. 0
    Does anyone know if graduating from U of A or Grant Mac Nursing Program had limitations on studying elsewhere (as in not in Canada). When I graduate I would like to get a job somewhere else and just wondering if certain programs had better chances of finding a job in other places.
  8. 0
    Quote from farrellb
    Does anyone know if graduating from U of A or Grant Mac Nursing Program had limitations on studying elsewhere (as in not in Canada). When I graduate I would like to get a job somewhere else and just wondering if certain programs had better chances of finding a job in other places.
    I don't know how many times we've told people this. Most places don't care where you went to school. They want to know that you passed the CRNE on the first try.
  9. 0
    I am presently a student in the AD program at the U of A. I do agree that CBL could be time consuming and tiring. However, after one semester, I am beginning to see how everything does come together and help one think critically. Sure, I would prefer the traditional lecture but I will endure all of CBL to graduate in 2 years with a BSCN. And the program is not bad. The first semester of the program, we have 4 hours of clinical each week at a long term residence. For the second semester it is 3 days of clinical per week in a hospital ( 2 weeks on, 2 weeks off). After one semester, I can say that the program is tough, time consuming, seminars could be tiring (it is all talking, but YOU LEARN A LOT TOO), labs are practical and you get hands on experience. Classes are very large (for lectures or FRS as they are called), 150- 220 students; professors are the same as every where, some are fabulous, others are to put it kindly inadequate. One thing for sure, get ready to do plenty of studying and do not expect to be spoon-fed. Concerning the amount of time you have to spend studying, doing research to write your different handouts for seminar and all the rest, although I have a postgraduate degree in another field, I did find it quite challenging but DOABLE. And with time one adjusts to the whole CBL process and it does not seem as stressful, at least for me. I think any person who gets into nursing should expect to see plenty of bodily fluid, poop etc. I certainly expect to see that and I am sure a lot of students in my cohort do too. Practical (clinical) experience? I do not see a problem if you are committed to wanting to learn, are humble enough to admit you do not know and are willing to ask for help. For those considering the program, I say ``go for it.``
  10. 0
    Reading this thread was quite disheartening. I cannot speak for anyone else's experience, but I am currently in the 4 year collaborative program at the U of A, and I have had an overall positive experience.

    I know that they're changing the program beginning Fall 2014 by removing CBL altogether and changing the sequence of clinicals, which I think is quite similar to what MacEwan already has.

    However, I have enjoyed my time here. This is not to say that it was easy and that I did not struggle with it in my first year, which I did. I was not used to the self-teaching methods, but like anything else, I learned it and now appreciate it. I can understand why many dislike it. But for myself, it has vastly improved my critical thinking skills and I can see the entire picture better. It's a different method of teaching and one may feel as if they are lacking information due to insufficient research from their peers. However, CBL classes provide you with "learning goals" with each scenario, which is the list of topics that you must know for the final. I admit that I felt quite lost in first year, but now when I study, I go right to the learning goals, and if there are lacks in information in others' research, it is easy to note and look it up myself (which should be done anyways).

    I had horrible instructors my entire first year and almost dropped the entire program (not because of CBL or clinical hours, but because my tutors were just terrible people). Many of these problems that are discussed will not be an issue anymore, as the entire program is getting a makeover. So that is a plus for the people who are considering the pros and cons between the two programs. Now, I guess we wait and see how this new program goes

    *p.s to anyone considering the U of A, it is a fantastic school and the nursing faculty staff is great!


Top