ethics question...

  1. I have a friend who returned to school a year or so ago and is pursuing nursing (as am I). The problem is that she basically flunked out of her first college (immature 18 yr old, didn't go to class, didn't bother to drop them either...)

    Long story short, she now has a great GPA and really is a different person than she was. She is debating about disclosing her previous college "attendance" because she knows that it will ruin her overall GPA. This of course is against school admission policies (I believe.)

    Is this the case - is there any forgiveness or if you mess up once in school are you done for?

    Thanks...
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   caliotter3
    You will get advice both ways. Some people have successfully started over and never disclose the previous bad record. Others will tell you that you can't get away with it. You will also hear that there are some schools that have "forgiveness" policies to varying degrees, that might apply here. It would be a good idea to anonymously ask about the forgiveness policy of any school or look it up in the catalog and then decide whether or not one would want to try to keep the previous mistakes undisclosed. However, remember that if financial aid was or will be sought or received, you must disclose whatever info is requested on the paperwork and then the cat is out of the bag. I would ask first.
  4. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    If you're asking whether it's unethical to hide part of the academic record then the answer is yes. I would also point out that discovery of such would be grounds for expulsion.

    The poor grades will be a factor but can be overcome. I had a similar record early one but later proved myself with several semesters of outstanding work.

    Encourage your friend to do the right thing -- be honest.
  5. by   lisacp75
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    If you're asking whether it's unethical to hide part of the academic record then the answer is yes. I would also point out that discovery of such would be grounds for expulsion.

    The poor grades will be a factor but can be overcome. I had a similar record early one but later proved myself with several semesters of outstanding work.

    Encourage your friend to do the right thing -- be honest.
    To Music in my Heart....

    How did your past academics affect you? In terms of getting into a program and financial aid? Unfortunately, when I was first discussing the issue with her I mentioned a story about somebody I knew who was in the same boat a while back. This person didn't disclose their past academic record, and went on to an Ivy League school... Now I feel like I should present another positive story to her where the person told the truth and wasn't punished for it...

    Thanks!
  6. by   Spidey's mom
    Honesty is always the way to go.

    I am however having trouble understanding this issue - our transcripts tell the story - how can we hide grades?

    steph
  7. by   Asherah
    Quote from stevielynn
    Honesty is always the way to go.

    I am however having trouble understanding this issue - our transcripts tell the story - how can we hide grades?

    steph
    If an applicant decided to hide part of their record they simply would leave the university/college off of the list of previous academic institutions and thus would not submit a transcript for that portion.

    Personally, I would never do this! Would anyone want to be constantly worrying that administration would find out (via financial aid records, etc.) and then get expelled from a program? No way.

    An individual should be honest, own up to their past academic indiscretions and explain why they've gained maturity. If the school doesn't accept that, find somewhere else. Trust me, I'm speaking from experience.
  8. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Asherah
    If an applicant decided to hide part of their record they simply would leave the university/college off of the list of previous academic institutions and thus would not submit a transcript for that portion.

    Personally, I would never do this! Would anyone want to be constantly worrying that administration would find out (via financial aid records, etc.) and then get expelled from a program? No way.

    An individual should be honest, own up to their past academic indiscretions and explain why they've gained maturity. If the school doesn't accept that, find somewhere else. Trust me, I'm speaking from experience.
    I guess I was thinking that all my college credits were of use to me in getting into a RN to BSN program. Otherwise I'd never have been accepted . . .I needed the credits to even apply. No way to hide anything.

    steph

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