Tell all about Arkansas! - page 3

by military spouse

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Hello, I would love to know all the info about relocating to AR--i.e., taxes, auto registration, reasonable/nice places for houses, utilities, etc. It seems like everybody has nice things to say about the hospitals and it has... Read More


  1. 0
    Hey cabykay! I, too, am from a small town @ 45 min north of Conway!!! (Ever heard of Alread)Technically doesn't qualify as a town, as it doesn't have a post office!
  2. 0
    Quote from mo-mo
    Hey cabykay! I, too, am from a small town @ 45 min north of Conway!!! (Ever heard of Alread)Technically doesn't qualify as a town, as it doesn't have a post office!
    of course I know where Alread is! I'm from Dennard.
  3. 0
    I've been in the military for a few years. But always go back for vacation to visit the family. About the racism, I have a minority husband,a Puerto Rican from NY, I have recieved LOTS of "comments" about how dark my girl is from my "friends". Although, I didn't live in a "small" town, most of my friends around me did. I've heard graduates of Bauxite say they have "run minoritys out" of their town. So yes in the smaller towns in AR the racism is still very much alive.

    I lived near Bryant, in Benton and most of my family is there. I do not know the statics on schools in AR and do not care to look them up but I DO know that I recieved a VERY good education.

    I love the mountains and can't wait until my daughter gets older so we can go on hikes. (she's 2). The lakes and fishing there great!
  4. 0
    Hello,
    I am 24 years old and I have lived in Arkansas all my life. Arkansas really is a good state to raise children in. I mean it's laid back and it's not that much trouble in the state. But I looked on the Internet a couple months back and we are the lowest paid state but the highest paid taxpayers. My husband and I are really thinking about moving once I get my nursing licences. I am from Jonesboro. I think that when we decided to have kids that I would want a place like this to raise them though. The houses down here are very affordable. You could get a brand new house with about 4 bedrooms in a good neighborhood for about 200,000. So I mean it's all about the town you pick and everything. All states and towns got problems and Arkansas is not an exception. So good luck!!!:spin:
  5. 0
    We live in NE ARK. COL is low but jobs are poor! Hubby has to travel out of state to find decent pay, along with probably half of our town! I'm sure there are parts of the state that do offer good jobs but I believe this area is not one of them! Many factories have shut-down. Drugs are horrible! I often think of moving just so my kids don't have to be around the drugs, but I know that eventually the drugs will be wherever we move to. The schools in this area are so-so. I remember people that I graduated with being awarded thousands and thousands of dollars worth of scholarships to top schools in the state only to go and figure out they weren't one bit prepared for college! While it is pretty and there is plenty of outdoor activities to do, if you can't make a living here its no use! We stay b/c of family but it is almost to the point that we are going to have to move where there are more and better jobs!
  6. 1
    Quote from Ex130Load

    STATUS QUO-UPDATE—I agree that Arkansas still is it a beautiful state with two of the top hospitals in the country. UAMS and Arkansas Children's Hospital are second to none in research, technology and medical breakthroughs. They have been ranked by US News and World Report as top facilities in the world. But if you are considering applying to UAMS for nursing school, consider its first time NCLEX pass rate—86%. I think cross-town competitors Baptist and UALR were in the high 90s. Call the AR Board of Nursing. UAMS had among the lower pass rates of four-year, two-year, and certificate programs.
    I am a student at UAMS and I was bothered by that quote so I thought I would look for myself. The Arkansas State Board of Nursing website has all of the schools passing rates. UAMS only scored 87% one out of the 5 years listed. The rest were in the 90s. UALR has been in the 90s in all 5 years, and Baptist was listed in the 80s in 4 of the years and in the 90s for the most recent. In 2007, the most recent, UAMS had 9 fail (85/94), Baptist 14 (214/228) and UALR 6 (78/84). As you can see they only differ from a few students, literally. There is no significant difference in the test scores.
    dextera likes this.
  7. 1
    Quote from Ex130Load

    STATUS QUO-UPDATE—I agree that Arkansas still is it a beautiful state with two of the top hospitals in the country. UAMS and Arkansas Children's Hospital are second to none in research, technology and medical breakthroughs. They have been ranked by US News and World Report as top facilities in the world. But if you are considering applying to UAMS for nursing school, consider its first time NCLEX pass rate—86%. I think cross-town competitors Baptist and UALR were in the high 90s. Call the AR Board of Nursing. UAMS had among the lower pass rates of four-year, two-year, and certificate programs.
    ok. ok....I know I am a dork for doing this but I took the time of comparing UAMS to ALL THREE programs and took the average of all 5 years posted on the Arkansas State Board of Nursing website. Of the diploma program, only 40% had higher scores than UAMS. Of the Associate's only 45% had higher scores than UAMS. and of the other baccalaurette schools; a whopping 32.5% had higher scores. As you can see UAMS has scored higher than more than half of the schools in all three programs in the last 5 years. AND combining the averages of all 3 programs in the last 5 years only 39% had higher scores than UAMS. UAMS had higher scores than 61% of all schools in all 3 programs in the past 5 years. So, I think it's self explanatory....In closing, UAMS is NOT "among the lower pass rates of four-year, two-year and certificate programs"
    dextera likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from i_am_julia
    typically, in the little rock area, it's subtle. if you are use to living in a large city, you will quickly see that the races don't mix on a friendly basis. it's very limited. i would caution any person of color from living outside of lr. the oppotunities are limited (in the entire state) and the ability to network and see other people who look like you is minimal. unless you are moving to ar on a short term basis, i wouldn't recommend it at all.
    this is funny. i'm a native of conway, which has a large black population. i'm white. my brother-in-law is black, very dark complexion, and my niece and nephew are mixed. i also have a mexican brother-in-law and a niece and nephew who are mixed with hispanic. we have not encountered the problems i read about on here. i know that there is still a lot of tension at central high school in lr but i don't know why, because from what i understand the majority of students are minorities. perhaps the tension is not only related to the original dilemma?

    i think it can be too convenient to throw up the race card when there are probably other issues involved. i know there is racism out there (on both sides of the fence, i know of black people who hate white people, too) but when we dwell on it we only contribute to the negativity. the kinds of people who are racist are not the kinds of people i care about having an impression on anyway. i love my nieces and nephews like they are my own and if anyone doesn't like it that's too bad. people are people.

    i tell you, i've faced a lot more discrimination in my life for being fat and ugly. i know what rejection is.
  9. 0
    Regarding, “I think it can be too convenient to throw up the race card, etc.” Regardless of the causes of racism, it’s alive and well here—subtle and otherwise. Cabot, among the fastest growing cities in AR has a culture historically based on racism. Check its demographics; it’s nearly pure white. I know of many military personnel who check out the local Jacksonville, Sherwood, and North Little Rock schools (the larger towns around Little Rock AFB north of metropolitan Little Rock), their racial percentages, and purposely opt for Cabot.

    The Democrat Gazette has the following to say regarding white flight occurring to this day in one of the three school districts within Pulaski County that incorporates Little Rock and its surrounding environs. For interested folk, feel free to read the entire article by going to the web address after the excerpt.

    “As a result of a decades-old pattern, more than 48 percent of the city’s white students in kindergarten through 12th grade attended private school in 2000, according to an Arkansas Democrat-Gazette analysis of census data. Among blacks, 4 percent did.
    Since 2000, the school district has lost 600 more white students, making it probable that the majority of white students in Little Rock are now in private schools.
    No other major city in Arkansas had a higher percentage of its white students in private schools in 2000. Only eight major cities in the United States did.
    The shift has pulled the Little Rock School District into a downward spiral that’s hard to escape: the diversion of millions of state dollars, diminished hopes for millage increases, and uneven teaching experience and parental involvement among schools.
    "It’s a constant, sloping trend," said Baker Kurrus, a five-year member of the Little Rock School Board. State school funding is tied to enrollment. For every child who leaves the Little Rock School District, the district loses about $4,700 in state funding, according to Don Stewart, chief financial officer for the district.”

    Friday, March 06, 2009 9:19:05 pm http://www.ardemgaz.com/ShowStorypre...ction=National

    Regarding UAMS’ first time NCLEX pass rates, my stats were current in 2007 when I originally posted my response. This is now 2009… Things change.

    “…But I took the time of comparing UAMS to ALL THREE programs and took the average of all 5 years posted on the Arkansas State Board of Nursing website. Of the diploma program, only 40% had higher scores than UAMS. Of the Associate's only 45% had higher scores than UAMS. and of the other baccalaurette schools; a whopping 32.5% had higher scores. As you can see UAMS has scored higher than more than half of the schools in all three programs in the last 5 years. AND combining the averages of all 3 programs in the last 5 years only 39% had higher scores than UAMS. UAMS had higher scores than 61% of all schools in all 3 programs in the past 5 years. So, I think it's self explanatory....In closing, UAMS is NOT "among the lower pass rates of four-year, two-year and certificate program.”

    Where to start??? Again, when I originally posted, my info was accurate. Again, this is 2009. I personally find it statistically significant that “Of the diploma program, only 40% had higher scores than UAMS” or “Of the Associate's only 45% had higher scores than UAMS. and of the other baccalaurette schools; a whopping 32.5% had higher scores.” 40%, 45%, and 32.5%--small insignificant numbers??? Back in 2007, UAMS was among the lower pass rates for four-year, two-year, and certificate programs. “Beating the dead horse,” I reiterate things can change…

    I’m a person of perspective. For those with the inclination, perhaps someone could track down the on-time graduation rates for Henderson/Hendrix in Searcy, UCA in Conway, Baptist in Little Rock, UAMS in Little Rock, and U of A Little Rock. I seem to remember about 113 showing up day-one for class for the four-year degree program (having entered the program with 60 hours or so undergrad/prerequisite work) at UAMS and graduating about 68 two years later—about 60%. That’s a lot of attrition. Are the other schools like that?

    For the record… If I come across as personally attacking anyone, that is not my intention. I also apologize if I seem overly “gung ho” or “appear to be going for the throat.” Again, that honestly wasn't my intention.

    Respectfully,
    Ex130Load
  10. 0
    Quote from Ex130Load
    Regarding, “I think it can be too convenient to throw up the race card, etc.” Regardless of the causes of racism, it’s alive and well here—subtle and otherwise. Cabot, among the fastest growing cities in AR has a culture historically based on racism. Check its demographics; it’s nearly pure white. I know of many military personnel who check out the local Jacksonville, Sherwood, and North Little Rock schools (the larger towns around Little Rock AFB north of metropolitan Little Rock), their racial percentages, and purposely opt for Cabot.

    The Democrat Gazette has the following to say regarding white flight occurring to this day in one of the three school districts within Pulaski County that incorporates Little Rock and its surrounding environs. For interested folk, feel free to read the entire article by going to the web address after the excerpt.

    “As a result of a decades-old pattern, more than 48 percent of the city’s white students in kindergarten through 12th grade attended private school in 2000, according to an Arkansas Democrat-Gazette analysis of census data. Among blacks, 4 percent did.
    Since 2000, the school district has lost 600 more white students, making it probable that the majority of white students in Little Rock are now in private schools.
    No other major city in Arkansas had a higher percentage of its white students in private schools in 2000. Only eight major cities in the United States did.
    The shift has pulled the Little Rock School District into a downward spiral that’s hard to escape: the diversion of millions of state dollars, diminished hopes for millage increases, and uneven teaching experience and parental involvement among schools.
    "It’s a constant, sloping trend," said Baker Kurrus, a five-year member of the Little Rock School Board. State school funding is tied to enrollment. For every child who leaves the Little Rock School District, the district loses about $4,700 in state funding, according to Don Stewart, chief financial officer for the district.”

    Friday, March 06, 2009 9:19:05 pm http://www.ardemgaz.com/ShowStorypre...ction=National

    Regarding UAMS’ first time NCLEX pass rates, my stats were current in 2007 when I originally posted my response. This is now 2009… Things change.

    “…But I took the time of comparing UAMS to ALL THREE programs and took the average of all 5 years posted on the Arkansas State Board of Nursing website. Of the diploma program, only 40% had higher scores than UAMS. Of the Associate's only 45% had higher scores than UAMS. and of the other baccalaurette schools; a whopping 32.5% had higher scores. As you can see UAMS has scored higher than more than half of the schools in all three programs in the last 5 years. AND combining the averages of all 3 programs in the last 5 years only 39% had higher scores than UAMS. UAMS had higher scores than 61% of all schools in all 3 programs in the past 5 years. So, I think it's self explanatory....In closing, UAMS is NOT "among the lower pass rates of four-year, two-year and certificate program.”

    Where to start??? Again, when I originally posted, my info was accurate. Again, this is 2009. I personally find it statistically significant that “Of the diploma program, only 40% had higher scores than UAMS” or “Of the Associate's only 45% had higher scores than UAMS. and of the other baccalaurette schools; a whopping 32.5% had higher scores.” 40%, 45%, and 32.5%--small insignificant numbers??? Back in 2007, UAMS was among the lower pass rates for four-year, two-year, and certificate programs. “Beating the dead horse,” I reiterate things can change…

    I’m a person of perspective. For those with the inclination, perhaps someone could track down the on-time graduation rates for Henderson/Hendrix in Searcy, UCA in Conway, Baptist in Little Rock, UAMS in Little Rock, and U of A Little Rock. I seem to remember about 113 showing up day-one for class for the four-year degree program (having entered the program with 60 hours or so undergrad/prerequisite work) at UAMS and graduating about 68 two years later—about 60%. That’s a lot of attrition. Are the other schools like that?

    For the record… If I come across as personally attacking anyone, that is not my intention. I also apologize if I seem overly “gung ho” or “appear to be going for the throat.” Again, that honestly wasn't my intention.

    Respectfully,
    Ex130Load
    Just to clarify, it's Harding that's in searcy. Henderson is in Arkadelphia...Hendrix is also in Conway, but no nursing program. Seems a lot of people forget about U of A, UAFS, Ark Tech, ASU, UAPB....there are many more BSN programs out there. It would be intersting to see how they compare.


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