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What should I do?

Mperez96 Mperez96 (New) New

Hi everyone,

I am here to ask for an opinion to what should I do because I can't seem to find the answer on my own. I first of am a senior High school student. I will be graduating very soon. Applications are due this week or the next for colleges. The thing is I don't want to go to college because an opportunity has been given to me. I have been given the chance to attend Medical School. Yes! I know its crazy because I am a high school student just graduating. The medical field I am going to study is LVN. The program is not longer than 12 months. After that I will be given the C-NExam in order to have my nurse license. By the time I have my license I will be 20-21 years old...very young I know. What should I do head to college for 4 years and pay 34 thousand or pay 34 thousand for 12 months and actually get a well payed job where I enjoy what I do...helping people?

You need to do further research. It is common to recommend to people in your position that they attend college with the goal of a BSN in nursing from the beginning. This will afford you a better opportunity for work and progress in your nursing career. Is this LPN program at your local community college, Regional Occupational Center, or adult school associated with your high school? Or is it at a proprietary school that wants to charge you $24,000 or more in tuition? What is the job outlook for LPNs in your area? Does this school provide job placement services for its graduates? What are your prospects for financial aid to attend this program? These are just some of the questions that you should have answered before you make your decision. Again, can not emphasize this enough, your path in nursing will be more easily served if you pursue a BSN in nursing so that you can be employed as an RN. Best wishes.

Prior to deciding on what academic path to take do a assesment. One evaluate your academic strengths and weeknesses by going to a guidance counsler at your local high school. A guidance counsler will give you a few personality tests to take. This help you discover based on your personality type what career interests are sutiable for you. Also reaseach the field of study your planning on going to school for. Interview nurses at local nursing homes, hosptials, and clinics. Ask questions about work load hours, pay, and academic requirements. Next look at public instutions over private instutions. At public intstitutions tuition is much more afforadable than private. Ultimately you will not have to pay back as much money when and if you graduate. Finally interview the school you want to attend by talking to students and intructors about tests, clinicals, and class room environment. This last bit of advice is what is the tie breaker. Ask your self will the profession you choose afford you the quality of lifestyle that you will be satisifed with? You have to be happy with the amount of pay as well as nature of your work.

I have researched a on many school about the medical program and its LVN. I have found that is a very long program to accomplish. The school that offers LVN for 12 months is the same as for a one semester in the college I wish to got. I have to make a choice and I want to make the right one. I also have meet many LVN that wish to have taken the short program instead of wasting 4 years in college.

Four years in college is not wasted when it results in a BSN degree. No proprietary nursing school LPN/LVN program, note the use of the word nursing rather than medical, is going to grant a BSN degree, a BA degree, or an ASN degree. One has to wonder why any LVN who attended college for four years only has an LVN license? Twelve months is not the medical "short course", it is the prescribed length of time for that school to award its LPN/LVN diploma. There are proprietary schools that offer a medical assisting diploma/certificate in as few as eight or nine months. There are also community colleges that offer LPN/LVN programs, two years in length, where one can choose to take the AS degree if they want, but those courses are not considered to be "short course" substitutes for the four year RN course of study.

Four years in college is not wasted when it results in a BSN degree. No proprietary nursing school LPN/LVN program, note the use of the word nursing rather than medical, is going to grant a BSN degree, a BA degree, or an ASN degree. One has to wonder why any LVN who attended college for four years only has an LVN license? Twelve months is not the medical "short course", it is the prescribed length of time for that school to award its LPN/LVN diploma. There are proprietary schools that offer a medical assisting diploma/certificate in as few as eight or nine months. There are also community colleges that offer LPN/LVN programs, two years in length, where one can choose to take the AS degree if they want, but those courses are not considered to be "short course" substitutes for the four year RN course of study.

Yes it is very much true but if you think about it its more of a part time job. 12 months and I get a great pay. Then I can go back to college and my parents don't have to pay as much as they would without me working

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