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What good is an MSN in Nurse Education? Can I actually plan on being hired?

Hello there,

I received my associates degree in 2001 and since then I have, for unexpected reasons, had to move around and then in 2005 I left nursing when my 2nd child was born. I had no idea that I would never be able to go back into nursing, even at entry level Med-Surg.

Anyway, I have been trying to figure out a way to dig myself out of this hole, which is painful and scary. Our family had expected to have that 2nd income again in a few years.

Since I never exactly loved being a floor nurse, and had always planned on going back to specialize in something, such as being a research nurse (I love research and I am married to a professor who does research all the time--I love helping with this) I thought that I would go back and get my MSN so that I could teach at a college level.

So, I have a couple questions that I would be so grateful to get some feedback on.

#1)

For starters, if I get at least my BSN then can I once again be considered a 'new grad' and be hired on as such? I ask because I feel that I would absolutely need that if I were to re-enter the floor. I would need the time with a mentor again. For starters I would be in a new area. I used to be a labor and delivery nurse but I would like to start out doing something that will open more doors for me in regards to future employment.

#2)

I had planned on attending a school that offers a RN to MSN program with nurse education being a specialty. Long story short I came across a job posting from this EXACT University in which they were looking for a professor of nursing for a tenure track position. They required a PhD in a related field and a masters in nursing.

HUMmmmm I thought.

So I called up the dean herself and asked her, Would I be hire-able with a Masters in Nurse Education at her University? I appreciate her honesty in telling me that no, I would never be hired at a 4 year University with only a masters. She told me that if I really wanted to teach then I needed to plan on getting my PhD.

So, what good is a Masters in Nurse Education?

At what level CAN I teach? At a respectable junior college? I mean, a very respectable one-like the one I graduated from.

Or, in a LPN program at a vocational school?

At a high school???

Or is it good for nothing.

#3)

I know that as educators you see many of your students be hired. You are up to date on hiring practices. I would love any advice as to how I can best re-enter nursing. Right now, after hearing this news about the Rn to MSN program I am planning on just entering the RN to BSN program and then trying to get a job as a floor nurse as a NEW GRAD! So I will get additional training (I am very type A and need to feel 110% that I know my stuff). Then I thought I could try to enter a RN to PhD program, part time while I am working.

Do you think I will be able to be hired as basically a new grad with no prior work experience? I was planning on just listing my first job out of school on my CV and omitting the rest since as I stated, it looks a bit like swiss cheese due to unexpected family health issues and my husbands career.

I thank you GREATLY for reading this and in advance for any insight and advice you may offer. I am, to be frank, freaking out here. I have no idea how to start over and I am terrified and lost--so whatever you can offer will, I assure you, help a fellow human being greatly.

Blessings,

CommonUnity

finchfamily4

Specializes in Wound care & basically everything else.

Most hospitals have nurse educators (MSN) My department has three with MSN's in education. All the clinical instructors I've interfaced with in my hospital are MSN's. Also I have met several MSN's in education who work for DME and Pharm companies. Plenty of jobs in the right cities.

Edited by finchfamily4
missed text

classicdame, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Hospital Education Coordinator.

I work in a hospital setting with MSN degree. I have friends teaching LVN and ADN nursing students. In my state you have to have a degree higher than the one you are teaching. Most universities prefer PhD, partly because they are able to teach all levels and partly because they can publish and write for grant money which sweetens the coffers of the school

ParkerBC,MSN,RN

Specializes in Medical Surgical/Addiction/Mental Health.

I work in a hospital setting with MSN degree. I have friends teaching LVN and ADN nursing students. In my state you have to have a degree higher than the one you are teaching. Most universities prefer PhD, partly because they are able to teach all levels and partly because they can publish and write for grant money which sweetens the coffers of the school

What about EdD in Nursing Education? I have seen multiple posts that require a doctoral degree. However, it doesn't stipulate which terminal degree. The same posts require one of the following: A Master of Science in Nursing and doctorate degree in a related field or a Master's degree in a related field and a doctoral degree in Nursing. By the way, the job post is for a heavy research-based school with an excellent reputation.

Your thoughts?

My BSN program had MSN prepared nurses on their faculty staff, but they were clinical instructors. I am certain they were hired for their clinical expertise and because there weren't enough nurses with doctorates to go around.

VickyRN, MSN, DNP, RN

Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds.

What about EdD in Nursing Education? I have seen multiple posts that require a doctoral degree. However, it doesn't stipulate which terminal degree. The same posts require one of the following: A Master of Science in Nursing and doctorate degree in a related field or a Master's degree in a related field and a doctoral degree in Nursing. By the way, the job post is for a heavy research-based school with an excellent reputation. ffice:office" />

Your thoughts?

Most baccalaureate programs require a Masters in Nursing (preferably Nursing Education), rather than a masters in a related field. Our program stipulates that faculty must have a masters in nursing or a doctoral degree in nursing. In our program, if the educator does not have a Masters in Nursing Education, he/she must take extra education courses as a requirement of continued employment.

VickyRN, MSN, DNP, RN

Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds.

Hello there,

I received my associates degree in 2001 and since then I have, for unexpected reasons, had to move around and then in 2005 I left nursing when my 2nd child was born. I had no idea that I would never be able to go back into nursing, even at entry level Med-Surg.

Anyway, I have been trying to figure out a way to dig myself out of this hole, which is painful and scary. Our family had expected to have that 2nd income again in a few years.

Since I never exactly loved being a floor nurse, and had always planned on going back to specialize in something, such as being a research nurse (I love research and I am married to a professor who does research all the time--I love helping with this) I thought that I would go back and get my MSN so that I could teach at a college level.

So, I have a couple questions that I would be so grateful to get some feedback on.

#1)

For starters, if I get at least my BSN then can I once again be considered a 'new grad' and be hired on as such? I ask because I feel that I would absolutely need that if I were to re-enter the floor. I would need the time with a mentor again. For starters I would be in a new area. I used to be a labor and delivery nurse but I would like to start out doing something that will open more doors for me in regards to future employment.

#2)

I had planned on attending a school that offers a RN to MSN program with nurse education being a specialty. Long story short I came across a job posting from this EXACT University in which they were looking for a professor of nursing for a tenure track position. They required a PhD in a related field and a masters in nursing.

HUMmmmm I thought.

So I called up the dean herself and asked her, Would I be hire-able with a Masters in Nurse Education at her University? I appreciate her honesty in telling me that no, I would never be hired at a 4 year University with only a masters. She told me that if I really wanted to teach then I needed to plan on getting my PhD.

So, what good is a Masters in Nurse Education?

At what level CAN I teach? At a respectable junior college? I mean, a very respectable one-like the one I graduated from.

Or, in a LPN program at a vocational school?

At a high school???

Or is it good for nothing.

#3)

I know that as educators you see many of your students be hired. You are up to date on hiring practices. I would love any advice as to how I can best re-enter nursing. Right now, after hearing this news about the Rn to MSN program I am planning on just entering the RN to BSN program and then trying to get a job as a floor nurse as a NEW GRAD! So I will get additional training (I am very type A and need to feel 110% that I know my stuff). Then I thought I could try to enter a RN to PhD program, part time while I am working.

Do you think I will be able to be hired as basically a new grad with no prior work experience? I was planning on just listing my first job out of school on my CV and omitting the rest since as I stated, it looks a bit like swiss cheese due to unexpected family health issues and my husbands career.

I thank you GREATLY for reading this and in advance for any insight and advice you may offer. I am, to be frank, freaking out here. I have no idea how to start over and I am terrified and lost--so whatever you can offer will, I assure you, help a fellow human being greatly.

Blessings,

CommonUnity

I would say the majority (or at least a high plurality) of nurse faculty at my College of Nursing (a very respectable enormous nursing program offering prelicensure BSN, RN to BSN, direct entry MSN, a plethora of MSN concentrations, and a PhD in Nursing concentration) possess only a Masters in Nursing (of some sort). Many (myself included) are working on getting a PhD or DNP. So, it really depends on your program. The masters-prepared faculty in my program are all "fixed term," not tenure track. In order to received tenure in my program, all new nurse faculty must have a PhD in nursing (or DNS) and then fulfill the requirements of the "tenure track."

Presently in North Carolina, one can teach in a community college ADN or LPN program with a BSN. This requirement may change in the year 2015.

However, all this being said, you are putting the cart before the horse. No one should be teaching nursing who is not proficient clinically. You will also not be hired within any respectable nursing program without strong clinical skills and a current practice. I would strongly advise you to take a nurse refresher course (if you contact your state's BON, they will give you information on accredited programs within your state). Here is an excellent link: http://www.nurse.com/education/refresher.htm After completing the refresher program, then you can decide on the next step in your career. Upon completion of the nurse refresher course, it would be best (IMHO) to get a fulltime job as a staff nurse within the hospital setting before proceding further. You should stay on the hospital unit for at least two years to acquire and hone the clinical and other skills you will need as a nursing instructor.

Best wishes to you :)

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