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Want to be an ICU nurse?

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loconno2 loconno2 (New) New

I'd like to be an ICU nurse.

In my previous job I worked on a telemetry floor where the predominant dxs were CHF, COPD and diabetes. The pace was fast but overwhelming for a new grad.

Now I'm working Ortho/Rehab at a small rural hospital and I am bored out of my skull. I used to love a "good chest pain" at my first nursing job and miss the action now. My current job just doesn't require much use of critical thinking skills.

My dad has been in ICUs 4-5 times within the past 9 years for various reasons, primarily due to his long battle with diabetes. So I know what it's like sit in an ICU for hours on end knowing your loved one is on the cusp of life. I think I could add a level of understanding and compassion for my patients and their families due to my first hand experience.

But I've held two different nursing jobs in two years and being an ICU nurse would likely require a change to another hospital. Plus, I'm concerned about the reality of tackling a job that is so prone to burn out.

What do I do?

HazelLPN, LPN

Specializes in Adult ICU/PICU/NICU. Has 54 years experience.

I'd like to be an ICU nurse.

In my previous job I worked on a telemetry floor where the predominant dxs were CHF, COPD and diabetes. The pace was fast but overwhelming for a new grad.

Now I'm working Ortho/Rehab at a small rural hospital and I am bored out of my skull. I used to love a "good chest pain" at my first nursing job and miss the action now. My current job just doesn't require much use of critical thinking skills.

My dad has been in ICUs 4-5 times within the past 9 years for various reasons, primarily due to his long battle with diabetes. So I know what it's like sit in an ICU for hours on end knowing your loved one is on the cusp of life. I think I could add a level of understanding and compassion for my patients and their families due to my first hand experience.

But I've held two different nursing jobs in two years and being an ICU nurse would likely require a change to another hospital. Plus, I'm concerned about the reality of tackling a job that is so prone to burn out.

What do I do?

I think it would be very interesting to go from ortho/rehab to ICU. In rehab in particular I'm sure you get to work with many former CHIs and S/P MVAs who may have spent weeks in ICU and see them able to learn to do their ADL again....you experinece there could bring another perspective to the ICU. I say go for it...if you don't like it you can always transfer.

Plus, I'm concerned about the reality of tackling a job that is so prone to burn out.

Where do you get the idea that ICU nursing is more prone to burnout than any other specialty? Most of the people I work with have worked ICU for between 10 and 20 years, and still love it. Besides, it's healthy to look for something new to do, to keep from getting bored in life...and you're a perfect example. Would you tell someone to not work in the places you've worked just because they might get burned out?

If you want to be constantly challenged a work, learn a TON, and like science and technology, I think you'd love the ICU. I do.

i live in the cleveland area and am in school. i would love to go into trauma, ccn, or icu. i've been told two different things. the first one is that hospitals love new grads so they can put them through their training and the new rn's aren't "set in their ways". the second one i've heard is the absolute opposite of the first one. they want someone with a year or two of experience. i already work for 2 doctor's and one of our patients knows me fairly well and she's a nurse. she called me an adrenaline junkie. is that good in an icu/trauma/ccn settings? what is your experience as far as new rn's in an er setting? for myself, i love running in many directions. in crazy situations i don't get flustered and have a cool head. i get creative on ways to solve the problem quickly. i'm a multi-tasker as well. any opinions would be great! :p

ER sounds like something you might enjoy. The best way to know would be to shadow nurses on different units. Also, in nursing school, you'll get exposed to different types of nursing.

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