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Vaccuum assist delivery and respiratory complications

NICU   (2,335 Views 7 Comments)
by santina44 santina44 (Member) Member

1,689 Profile Views; 26 Posts

Are there increased chances of respiratory complications when a baby is delivered using a vaccuum device such as a Kiwi?

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26 Posts; 1,689 Profile Views

Google searched and got a wealth of information!

Thanks for the info.. I consulted the forums because I would've preferred first hand info from other nurses.

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1,029 Posts; 15,812 Profile Views

Thanks for the info.. I consulted the forums because I would've preferred first hand info from other nurses.

No problems here. But we only see the baby 1-2 hrs after. Though if this is for work or a paper you'd be best to look at published research papers

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26 Posts; 1,689 Profile Views

No problems here. But we only see the baby 1-2 hrs after. Though if this is for work or a paper you'd be best to look at published research papers

It's not for a paper. I'm a NICU nurse. 2 NICU RNs go to C sections and high risk vag deliveries so we see them right away at my hospital. Just a few days ago I went to a section and a baby was delivered with a kiwi vaccuum. The baby had a little more difficulties than I had seen with other babies and was wondering if the vaccuum had anything to do with it. That's all.

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Are there increased chances of respiratory complications when

a baby is delivered using a vaccuum device such as a Kiwi?

Vacuum delivery increases the rates of neonatal cephalohematoma compared with forceps deliveryHemorrhages typically resolve without sequelae within four weeks of birth, but cephalohematoma can lead to hyperbilirubinemia. One study showed no differences in vision problems or in child development five years after vacuum or forceps delivery Operative vaginal delivery is a risk factor for shoulder dystocia, and it appears to be more common with vacuum delivery than with forceps delivery The incidence of shoulder dystocia increases in cases of fetal macrosomia and can also make Intracranial hemorrhage and subgaleal or subaponeurotic hematomas , Signs and Symptoms of Serious Intracranial Injury in a Neonate


[TABLE]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Intracranial hemorrhage

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Apnea

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Bradycardia

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Bulging fontanel

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Convulsions

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Irritability

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Lethargy

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Poor feeding

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Subgaleal hematoma

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Diffuse head swelling that shifts with repositioning and indents on palpation

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Signs of hypovolemic shock (hypotension, pallor, tachycardia, tachypnea)

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Swelling not limited by suture lines (unlike cephalohematoma)

[/TD]

[/TR]

[/TABLE]


note: Signs or symptoms may not appear until several hours after birth.

 

 

 

i hope i help u

 

 

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26 Posts; 1,689 Profile Views

Vacuum delivery increases the rates of neonatal cephalohematoma compared with forceps deliveryHemorrhages typically resolve without sequelae within four weeks of birth, but cephalohematoma can lead to hyperbilirubinemia. One study showed no differences in vision problems or in child development five years after vacuum or forceps delivery Operative vaginal delivery is a risk factor for shoulder dystocia, and it appears to be more common with vacuum delivery than with forceps delivery The incidence of shoulder dystocia increases in cases of fetal macrosomia and can also make Intracranial hemorrhage and subgaleal or subaponeurotic hematomas , Signs and Symptoms of Serious Intracranial Injury in a Neonate


[TABLE]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Intracranial hemorrhage

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Apnea

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Bradycardia

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Bulging fontanel

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Convulsions

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Irritability

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Lethargy

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Poor feeding

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Subgaleal hematoma

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Diffuse head swelling that shifts with repositioning and indents on palpation

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Signs of hypovolemic shock (hypotension, pallor, tachycardia, tachypnea)

[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD=colspan: 1]Swelling not limited by suture lines (unlike cephalohematoma)

[/TD]

[/TR]

[/TABLE]


note: Signs or symptoms may not appear until several hours after birth.

i hope i help u

Thank you Merna for your reply!

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