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Unsure about Competency... Distraught New Grad

First Year   (472 Views 5 Comments)
by _Cecilia_ _Cecilia_, BSN (New Member) New Member

211 Profile Views; 9 Posts

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The past month leading up to graduation has been super rough. Often, I question my ability in relation to other Nursing Students, especially after using HESI and UWorld. I feel that I may not have the ability to be a great nurse because of how I am as a person.

I feel unsure, worried about many things (i.e. how poorly I might handle stress, experienced nurses demeaning me during my first year of my first job, etc.), and too slow (mentally) to do well in my Nursing career.

I'd love to be a nurse and have a positive, lifelong effect on my patients, and I'd love to motivate and inspire pediatric patients in the future... but I'm just not sure if I have the ability to...

 

For those who've felt this and conquered these feelings before, how have you conquered them?

For those who feel this way now, this thread is to help support both you and me.

 

Thanks in advance! 

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tacticool has 3 years experience as a ASN, BSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in Trauma, EMS, Neuro.

287 Posts; 3,606 Profile Views

I see BSN in your byline, but not RN. Have you passed NCLEX? It's natural to have questions, doubts, etc. However, in the nursing world, you are never alone. Your fellow nurses (gals included) will help you as you learn. You'll make mistakes, as we all do, but as long as learn from your mistakes, you'll be OK.  You mention some future goals, so go after them. If you've identified goals, then you probably have the ability.

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On 6/15/2019 at 7:50 PM, tacticool said:

I see BSN in your byline, but not RN. Have you passed NCLEX? It's natural to have questions, doubts, etc. However, in the nursing world, you are never alone. Your fellow nurses (gals included) will help you as you learn. You'll make mistakes, as we all do, but as long as learn from your mistakes, you'll be OK.  You mention some future goals, so go after them. If you've identified goals, then you probably have the ability.

I have not yet taken the NCLEX yet; I'm a new graduate. Thank you for your kind words! I am just concerned that I won't be competent enough to start with, and that hospitals won't even try to give me a chance. Of course, I understand that there should still be a level of competency because it's important for the safety of the patients -- I just feel I may not be there.

When you were a first year RN, what did you tell yourself to help keep yourself afloat?

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tacticool has 3 years experience as a ASN, BSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in Trauma, EMS, Neuro.

287 Posts; 3,606 Profile Views

You are obviously intelligent in that you know you're not competent. No one starts off competent, or is competent until you start to DEVELOP competency by practicing as a nurse under a good preceptor. You need a good, competent preceptor to help you develop competency and critical thinking skills. These two go hand-in-hand. Remember Bennett's Levels of Competency from school? Competency is an on-going pursuit as you eventually make it to Expert (I think that's the last level).

What I did was to listen, ask questions, and learn as I went along. I have a lot of self-confidence and prior experience as a paramedic and Navy Hospital Corpsman. But I didn't start nursing thinking I knew it all. I knew I was in a different, unfamiliar arena.

Get into a good new Nurse Residency Program. With a good preceptor, you'll be mentored as you grow and won't be cut loose until you have achieved a basic level of competency. And NEVER forget you always have a backup- your fellow nurses, you CNAs (great resource!), your Charge Nurse, and your Nurse Manager/Director. Never be afraid to ask questions, or ask for help.

Now go take NCLEX and kick it in the a$$!

 

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9 Posts; 211 Profile Views

On 6/18/2019 at 3:42 PM, tacticool said:

You are obviously intelligent in that you know you're not competent. No one starts off competent, or is competent until you start to DEVELOP competency by practicing as a nurse under a good preceptor. You need a good, competent preceptor to help you develop competency and critical thinking skills. These two go hand-in-hand. Remember Bennett's Levels of Competency from school? Competency is an on-going pursuit as you eventually make it to Expert (I think that's the last level).

What I did was to listen, ask questions, and learn as I went along. I have a lot of self-confidence and prior experience as a paramedic and Navy Hospital Corpsman. But I didn't start nursing thinking I knew it all. I knew I was in a different, unfamiliar arena.

Get into a good new Nurse Residency Program. With a good preceptor, you'll be mentored as you grow and won't be cut loose until you have achieved a basic level of competency. And NEVER forget you always have a backup- your fellow nurses, you CNAs (great resource!), your Charge Nurse, and your Nurse Manager/Director. Never be afraid to ask questions, or ask for help.

Now go take NCLEX and kick it in the a$$!

 

Thank you Tacticool! Honestly, I've given the advice to others that failure isn't a failure, rather a learning experience, and that no one gets to where they are without mistakes. Ironically enough, it's hard to tell myself that, but you're right.

Being a little uncomfortable is always better than being comfortable because you'll have more of a yearning to learn when uncomfortable.

What matters is the effort and what you take from the experiences.

Just need to practice telling myself that 🙂

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