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Starting at MCC in August, anyone else?

Arizona   (856 Views 6 Comments)
by Kyanny Kyanny (New Member) New Member

682 Visitors; 8 Posts

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After waiting over a year, I am finally starting nursing school at MCC this fall. I am excited and also very scared and nervous. I have not opened a text book since finishing pre-reqs. Spent the last year working to save up for nursing school expenses and to have money to live off during school. Would love to hear from anyone that has gone through Block I, for any words of wisdom on what to expect. What should I be doing to be ready? I'm still working for 2 more months full time and have a family to care for. I have purchased books, shoes, uniform, etc. I am more interested in what to prepare for mentally. Also, would love to hear from anyone that is beginning this same journey.

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1,827 Visitors; 84 Posts

After waiting over a year, I am finally starting nursing school at MCC this fall. I am excited and also very scared and nervous. I have not opened a text book since finishing pre-reqs. Spent the last year working to save up for nursing school expenses and to have money to live off during school. Would love to hear from anyone that has gone through Block I, for any words of wisdom on what to expect. What should I be doing to be ready? I'm still working for 2 more months full time and have a family to care for. I have purchased books, shoes, uniform, etc. I am more interested in what to prepare for mentally. Also, would love to hear from anyone that is beginning this same journey.

I am currently enrolled in Rio Salado's Nursing program. It is part of MCC system. Be prepared to read a lot. In addition to reading more than you ever have in your whole life, buy yourself a good supply of pens that you are comfortable with when you write, because you will be doing a lot of it. More than anything else, nursing school will change the way you look at and see things around you. It is not a matter of what is wrong with the patient and how you can fix it, but how is what is wrong with the patient going to affect them, and how can you make it better, avoid further damage or injury, minimize adverse affects, etc. Sometimes the process is very subtle, and other times it is very deliberate. Either way, when you finish, you will realize that your thinking now infiltrates into other areas of your life. And as much as you try to fight it, it really will help. Every program has its "bumps." Take it from me, the program at Rio has lots of bumps, and some are very big, significant, horrible bumps. Keep your mind on what you are doing, learn everything you can, even if what you are learning is "what you DON'T want to be as a nurse." Don't try to show them what you already know. For the teachers and your clinical instructors, they would rather see what you have learned and how you impliment it. And while your classmates may come to be some of your best friends, remember that the reason you are there is to learn, not to be part of a click.

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2,547 Visitors; 321 Posts

After waiting over a year, I am finally starting nursing school at MCC this fall. I am excited and also very scared and nervous. I have not opened a text book since finishing pre-reqs. Spent the last year working to save up for nursing school expenses and to have money to live off during school. Would love to hear from anyone that has gone through Block I, for any words of wisdom on what to expect. What should I be doing to be ready? I'm still working for 2 more months full time and have a family to care for. I have purchased books, shoes, uniform, etc. I am more interested in what to prepare for mentally. Also, would love to hear from anyone that is beginning this same journey.

Congratulations! I'l be entering Block 4 at MCC in the fall. The instructors there are really awesome, you will learn ALOT from them! There are a few of instructors there that were born to teach, you will never get tired of hearing them lecture! My class follows the "old" curriculum so I can't give you specifics about your classes, however, I strongly recommend that ou purchase the Saunder's Review for NCLEX (by Silvestri) to help you prepare for testing. It will really help you to understand the "critical thinking" and "application" types of questions. Another thing that I found helpful was the RN Notes pocket guide. For around 25.00 you get basically most of the info you'lllern in Block 1 in a neat little notebook you can tuck in your pocket (it comes in a pda version as well.)

Other things you may want to do before you start include:

1. Give your house a really good spring cleaning. You won't have much time for that once classes begin!

2. Go to Costco or Sams and do a major stock up shopping of non-perishables, toilet paper, soap etc.....

3. Let people know ahead of time that Nursing School is really time consuming so that you may not have as much time for other activities. This will avoid hurt feelings later down the road.

4. If you have children arrange for backup child care. You are generally allowed one-two missed clinical days per semester. No more...We have lost a handful of people from our class due to absences or lates to clinicals.

5. Buy lots and lots of computer printer paper and ink because you will print out all of your powerpoint lectures. I generally go through 2 ink cartidges a semester.

Count on being in school all day monday through thursday. Even though classes may not be that long youwill have to spend time in the lab practicing skills. Also, once you start clinicals, allow yourself 4-6 hours the day before clinical to go to the hospital, pick your patient(s), and do youe preliminary careplans.....

I hope this info helps...A friend of mine at work is also starting Block 1 in the fall and she is chomping at the bit to start!

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Thank you both for taking the time to give me some much appreciated advice. I am really looking forward to getting started and am going to try not to let the worry intimidate me too much. All new things are scary, I'll just take one step at a time and eventually will reach my goal. Do you think it is feasible to work 10 hour shifts on Friday and Saturday only? I really need the money to contribute to the household budget. I don't want work to interfere with nursing school though, what do you think? My children are teenagers and self sufficient and husband is supportive. Will this schedule be doable?

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Thank you both for taking the time to give me some much appreciated advice. I am really looking forward to getting started and am going to try not to let the worry intimidate me too much. All new things are scary, I'll just take one step at a time and eventually will reach my goal. Do you think it is feasible to work 10 hour shifts on Friday and Saturday only? I really need the money to contribute to the household budget. I don't want work to interfere with nursing school though, what do you think? My children are teenagers and self sufficient and husband is supportive. Will this schedule be doable?

It's going to depend on how organized you are and how much flexibility you have at work. I was able to work 12 hours/wk during Blocks 2 and 3. It did get a little stressful at times, and depending on my exam schedule, there were weekends where I couldn't work. On the other hand, a friend of mine has been able to work 2 16 hours shifts on the weekends since she started Block 1 but she requires very little sleep.....

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It's going to depend on how organized you are and how much flexibility you have at work. I was able to work 12 hours/wk during Blocks 2 and 3. It did get a little stressful at times, and depending on my exam schedule, there were weekends where I couldn't work. On the other hand, a friend of mine has been able to work 2 16 hours shifts on the weekends since she started Block 1 but she requires very little sleep.....

Also, try not to stress too much about the program. The information being presented really isn't difficult. If you have a good understanding of Bio and patho then you will do fine. The thing that trips up most new students is the criticla thinking type questions. If you get the Saunders book, read the chapter that explains how to take the tests, it really helps a lot. The "hardest" thing I found to be was just the sheer volume of information that was being presented. If you stay on top of things and don't fall behind, then you shouldn't have a problem.

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