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RN vs BSN

Pennsylvania   (1,042 Views 5 Comments)
by mzeinab mzeinab (New Member) New Member

642 Visitors; 8 Posts

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Hi there,

I'm writing requesting advise and help in choosing RN vs BSN. I was in school for accelerated nursing program that takes 16 months to be completed. After the first month in the nursing school I found out that I had Hodgkin s lymphoma. So I dropped and received the treatment. Now the Dr. Released me to go back to school.

However, the school was very expensive and my financial situation is critical so I had to find a job. Now I'm working but still dreaming of pursuing my BSN.

I am thinking of either attend a college to get an RN in two years and then I can get into RN to BSN online. This way I can save money and might keep my job. Not sure about staying at work though since I have two little kids and would be hard to juggle between work, school and home.

The second option is to quit the job and go back to finish the ABSN in 16 months.

What is confusing me is time versus money. Which option I need to pick, to save time or to save money?

Besides, hospitals in Philadelphia don't hire RN's without bachelor. So it will take me another 3 years at least to be able to work in a hospital.

I really need help and advises from your experience.

Thank you

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Meriwhen is a ASN, BSN, RN and works as a Psychiatric sheep...er, nurse.

38 Likes; 2 Followers; 2 Articles; 58,848 Visitors; 7,837 Posts

RN and BSN have the same end result. A BSN is a bachelor's of science in nursing, which allows you to sit for the NCLEX to become a RN. You become a nurse (upon passing NCLEX of course) with a 4-year degree under your belt. However, you could graduate from a nursing diploma or ADN program and that would also allow you to sit for the NCLEX. In this case, once you pass, you're also a RN, just with a 2 year or no degree.

Since you were in an accelerated program but had to withdraw, it's safe to presume that you already have many of the nursing pre-req classes done (A&P, microbio, stats, etc.), so if you were to do the 2-year ADN, it would actually only take 2 years. However, the fact that it's only a 2-year program doesn't mean it'll be any easier, because most ADN programs will kick your butt as hard, if not harder, than BSN programs. Nor would you have as much free time as you think--odds are good that you might have to cut back your hours or even quit to focus on schoolwork.

Another thing to consider is your local job market. You said yourself that Philly wants BSN, so the pursue the ADN would only prolong how long it'd take to be working in a hospital. Philly is next to NJ, and Trenton may have a better job market for ADNs...but do you want to commute?

IMO, if you can, go back to the ABSN program. It's going to take you as long to do a ADN as it would to complete this program, and you're going to be just as busy no matter which program you take on.

Best of luck whatever you decide.

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642 Visitors; 8 Posts

Hi, really appreciate your advise.

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pmabraham has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a Hospice RN Case Manager.

5 Likes; 44,831 Visitors; 2,488 Posts

Also, one can get take the NCLEX-RN boards as a graduate of a diploma program or associate program, and then go for their BSN; often times there's an economic savings to do so.

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245 Visitors; 2 Posts

Dear colleague, I applaud your perseverance. I do have 3 kids and have gotten BSN from Thomas Jefferson University. My only regret is that I did not proceed to NP right away. It only takes ONE year more and then you will able to work even during not-so-good health periods of your life. As long as I've heard the highest demand is for Psych NP

Are you in Philly? 

 

   Julia

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