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CRNA   (3,058 Views | 11 Replies)

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Just a general question to all students and CRNA's, Which resource books do you find the most helpful?

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169 Posts; 2,447 Profile Views

Just a general question to all students and CRNA's, Which resource books do you find the most helpful?

Personally, I like Morgan and Mikhail's Clinical Anesthesiology. It's a good reference for the quick explanation on things.

Sprout :nurse:

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59 Posts; 2,281 Profile Views

I use Morgan and Mikhail a lot. It's a great starting point for almost any question and it has many great illustrations and graphs.

The Mass General handbook is also very good.

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96 Posts; 1,585 Profile Views

i thought stoelting, "pharmacology of anesthetic agents" was a good resourse for pharm.

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1,093 Posts; 5,821 Profile Views

i have to say - all of them....Stoelting is good...and alot of times i even get into Miller for a more in depth answer....

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140 Posts; 3,242 Profile Views

i have to say - all of them....Stoelting is good...and alot of times i even get into Miller for a more in depth answer....
I think you're probably referring to Big Miller not Baby Miller. Big Miller is a two volume beast which is the bible of anesthesia. It's awesome!!! But expensive and daunting. Anesthesia and CoExisting Disease by Stoelting and Dierdorf is awesome. Morgan and McKhail is wonderful. For pharm, Stoleling is great...but I would recommend Evers and Maze which is an adjunct to Miller (it just came out). Good luck!!!

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153 Posts; 2,904 Profile Views

Evers and Maze is similar to Stoelting's Pharm and Phys, and it rocks! It really bridges the gap between drug action at the cellular level and it's clinical effects, in addition to a very well written phys section as well.

Yao & Artusio is a collection of case studies that is a very nice way to see how to think through specific cases and anticipate individual needs.

You can't go wrong with Barash, Miller, M&M, or Brown's Atlas of Regional Anesthesia.

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462 Posts; 6,154 Profile Views

I have a couple of books on my booklist that are listed as "recommended but not required." Anyone have any feedback on any of the following books?

Dorsch & Dorsch Understanding Anesthesia Equipment" (1999)

Guyton & Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology (2000)

Jaffe & Samuels Anesthesiologist's Manual of Surgical Procedures (2004)

Nagelhout & Zaglaniczny Nurse Anesthesia (2000)

Thanks in advance for any info you guys have!!

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612 Posts; 6,266 Profile Views

heartICU,

Dorsch and Dorsch is one of my required texts. It is very detailed and hidiously boring. However, it is considered to be the "bible" of anesthesia equipment books. It is hard to read, but has a lot of info in it. Although it is the book we are using, I also supplement with other texts that are a little easier to read.

Guyton is also our required text for physiology. I think it is a very thorough and well written book. I feel like I have memorized half the book already. It was tough at first, but it is actually starting to grow on me.

Nagelhout is also required by my program. I am not that fond of it. I tend to read Stoeltings 'Basics of Anesthesia' or Morgan and Mikhail's 'Clinical Anesthesiology' more often. If it is not required by your program, I would not spend the money on it.

As for the Jaffe book, I have no experience. I would love to hear from anyone elso that may have used it.

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16 Posts; 1,025 Profile Views

HeartICU,

Guyton Hall is an awesome physiology text...very readable. We use both Guyton/Hall and Berne/Levy in my program and I must say I prefer to read out of Guyton.

Dorsch and Dorsch "Understanding Anesthesia Equipment" is great for getting the "down and dirty" on every aspect of the anesthesia machine...which you will be expected to know inside out, upside down and backwards...you have to be able to understand the anesthesia machine and be able to trouble shoot any problems with it.

Of course... it would be best to get in touch with someone already in the program which you will be attending and get their advise regarding texts...because as with everything it varies from program to program.

Like everyone above I highly recommend Morgan and Mikhail "Clinical Anesthesiology"...I refer to mine as "the bible"!

Hope this helps...Good Luck!!

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1,093 Posts; 5,821 Profile Views

Jaffe is required for us as well - i couldn't live w/o it....

all your surgical procedures are detailed as well as pre/post and maintenance considerations regarding your anesthetic technique

we have to do "case plans" - and this book will save your life it you are required to do these.

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443 Posts; 6,731 Profile Views

Jaffe is required for us as well - i couldn't live w/o it....

all your surgical procedures are detailed as well as pre/post and maintenance considerations regarding your anesthetic technique

we have to do "case plans" - and this book will save your life it you are required to do these.

dorche and dorche you could possibly do without. Guyton is a must have if your a first year.

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