Jump to content

Pre-Nursing Student (Needs General Advice)

LPN/LVN   (354 Views 4 Comments)
by AshtonR AshtonR (Member)

AshtonR works as a Nursing Student (LPN).

217 Visitors; 16 Posts

advertisement

Hello! 

I'm taking the HESI this upcoming weekend for a year long LPN program. I'm currently working as a internet sales representative for a used car dealership. I've been doing this for 5 years now and I absolutely hate it. I need a major career change.

I need advice about being an LPN or the day to day life of an LPN! I don't know any LPNs and I've heard that the job can be draining and not very rewarding. Is this something I should pursue? I made about $63K last year in the car business but I despise it. I know I will be taking a pay cut as an LPN. I'm worried about my mental, physical and emotional health as I decide to take this career on. I've read a ton of negative feedback online. Any advice will help ❤️  Thank you in advance!

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

jheca83 has 10 years experience as a ASN and works as a RN at rehab hospital.

31 Visitors; 2 Posts

Depending on where you are located you might have limited jobs as an LPN. In my area LPNs can’t work in the hospitals so mostly work at rehabs, long term care (nursing homes), clinics and home care. If you’re in a facility it is long hours on your feet and yes can be draining. You are working with patients and families and sometimes aren’t treated nicely by either but also sometimes have very good relationships. Kinda hit or miss you have to be able to let a lot of it roll off of you.  It’s challenging and rewarding for varying reasons. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ShadowNurse has 3 years experience.

459 Visitors; 83 Posts

I was an LPN in pediatric home care; I've continued the job now that I'm an RN. I usually have 2-3 cases going at once, and a typical day looks like this:

I arrive at the home and take report from the child's last caregiver. This is almost always a parent/grandparent, but occasionally another nurse. I do my initial assessment and chart a little. Medications or feedings are usually due soon after I come on shift, so those get done. I change post-op dressings, suction trachs, vent g-tubes. The children and I play, do therapies. I call medical supply companies, have meetings with social workers/therapists/Medicaid-employed nurses who visit the homes. I liaise between doctors, hospitals, social workers, therapists, other home care nurses, and my own agency/boss, plus an interpreter for one case where the primary language is not English. My kids are pretty medically fragile, so any change of condition can be a challenge (translation: It's been a rough winter). I accompany my kids and their parents to doctor's appointments, out on the community, to school, and occasionally to the hospital if the child is acutely ill or needs to have a procedure done. Many of my parents are veterans of navigating the complex world of caring for a medically fragile child, but I do some teaching and education.

Overall it's a job where your skills need to be strong because you wear a lot of hats. Strong nursing skills, strong people skills, strong logistical skills, and firm boundaries. I would not say this is a job for everyone, but those that are suited really do enjoy it, me included. Hopefully that helps give you some insight.

Edited by ShadowNurse

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AshtonR works as a Nursing Student (LPN).

217 Visitors; 16 Posts

Thank you so much for your input! I really appreciate it! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×