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nursing student needs help with pharmacology911!

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help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!, is there anyone out there who can give me some tips on how to remember everything in pharmacology, how body systems react to different drugs, do you know of any book that will help me in pharmacology, we are at para and symp nerv, system blockers cholinergic, analgesic and nsaids, is there and way to remember all the drug names and prototypes. is there any book out there that would be usefull, teacher said most her pharm questions come from the nclex is there a (pharmacology for dummies series w/cd, can i get some advice or someone to correspond with thanks lpn student:rotfl:

That's a big request. Most of the info has to do with memorization. I will give you one hint: learn the difference between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system (or just learn one, as the other is the opposite reaction). Then determine which med affects which system. Amazingly enough, the actions seem to make sense after that. Also, pay attention to similar chemical names ("LOL = BP med; "CIN or CYN = antibiotic. Not always true, but sure pops up a lot.)

That's a big request. Most of the info has to do with memorization. I will give you one hint: learn the difference between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system (or just learn one, as the other is the opposite reaction). Then determine which med affects which system. Amazingly enough, the actions seem to make sense after that. Also, pay attention to similar chemical names ("LOL = BP med; "CIN or CYN = antibiotic. Not always true, but sure pops up a lot.)
thanks thats a good start:o i willl take your suggestion

the other post mentions the nervous system. The sympathetic, don't quote me, is the one that speeds everything up. Think of the fight or flight response. You've got sweating, increased heart rate, increased bp, and also the digestive system sort of slows down and you don't think about urinating. Then the parasympathetic is aka rest and digest or so the teacher called it. Check out the medical section of your library to look at either nursing books or pharmacology.

XIGRIS

Specializes in DNAP Student.

Pharmacology is a broad topic but I'll site some salient features.

When one studies pharmacology, one deals with any substances that interact with living systems thru chemical processes. One substance thats the core of pharm is drug. When you stduy drug, you study the Phamacokinetics ( what the body do the drugs like absorption, distribution, meatablosim and elimination ) and the Pharmacodynamics ( what the drug does to the body ).

Just an FYI, majority of the drugs are weak acids and weak bases but most of this drugs that are bases are shipped/manufactured ACIDIFIED ( ie: addition of hydrochoride ). Without acidification, an ordinary Tylenol with tear the stomach up because of increasing pH in the stomach. I know this part was not taught to me in nursing school.

Regarding the Parasympathetic and sympathetic effects of the drug.... Ok each organ system has different effects. Sometimes I guess you just need to memorize them there is no easy way out. I can tell you all the effects however, this would be a long discussion and I'm afraid they wont allow me. I think a simple way to remember is that the Neurotransmitter for Para is Acetylcholine and the Neurotransmitter for sympathetic is Norepinephrine.

When you increase Acetylcholine transmission you classify it as Cholinergic and if you block it you call it Anticholenergic.

Increase Norepi is termed Adrenergic and if it is blocked it is either called alpha blocker ( all the Zosin ending drugs ), beta blocker ( all your LOL ending drugs ). Majority of the adrenergic drugs are used to increased BP while the blockers are used either to lower BP or to help alleviate MI.

If you have question regarding the Autonomic Nervous System, you can ask me I would be willing to help. You see Pharm is very broad subject.

Pharmacology is a broad topic but I'll site some salient features.

When one studies pharmacology, one deals with any substances that interact with living systems thru chemical processes. One substance thats the core of pharm is drug. When you stduy drug, you study the Phamacokinetics ( what the body do the drugs like absorption, distribution, meatablosim and elimination ) and the Pharmacodynamics ( what the drug does to the body ).

Just an FYI, majority of the drugs are weak acids and weak bases but most of this drugs that are bases are shipped/manufactured ACIDIFIED ( ie: addition of hydrochoride ). Without acidification, an ordinary Tylenol with tear the stomach up because of increasing pH in the stomach. I know this part was not taught to me in nursing school.

Regarding the Parasympathetic and sympathetic effects of the drug.... Ok each organ system has different effects. Sometimes I guess you just need to memorize them there is no easy way out. I can tell you all the effects however, this would be a long discussion and I'm afraid they wont allow me. I think a simple way to remember is that the Neurotransmitter for Para is Acetylcholine and the Neurotransmitter for sympathetic is Norepinephrine.

When you increase Acetylcholine transmission you classify it as Cholinergic and if you block it you call it Anticholenergic.

Increase Norepi is termed Adrenergic and if it is blocked it is either called alpha blocker ( all the Zosin ending drugs ), beta blocker ( all your LOL ending drugs ). Majority of the adrenergic drugs are used to increased BP while the blockers are used either to lower BP or to help alleviate MI.

If you have question regarding the Autonomic Nervous System, you can ask me I would be willing to help. You see Pharm is very broad subject.

I really appreciate your reply, that makes things a little bit more simple for me, you put it in a way that i could really understand. the pharm book that we have for this class tries to confuse you by nameing something one way and then naming the same thing something else which adds alot of confusion to the whole thing. the workbook isnt all that great either the pharm teacher said she didn't like it either, but we couldn't use the same book as the RN's. do you mind if i write back! thanks the help is appreciated, if not thanks for the information.:)

NurseMac

Has 4 years experience.

You probably already know about the "Made Incredibly Easy" series of books - but if not - you can find them at Borders, Barnes and Nobles, and Amazon. For the basic Pathophysiology class I found "Fluids and Electrolytes Made Incredibly Easy" and "Pathophysiology Made Incredibly Easy" to be very useful. They simplify just a bit too much but they are great for giving the core information which you can add more to later.

For basic pharmacology, I found "Nursing Pharmacology Made Incredibly Easy" to be very useful. It has great nursing diagnoses along with the pharmacological information. This was most helpful with case study assignments. Don't get "Clinical Pharmacology Made Incredibly Easy" as it has the same information exactly as the Nursing Pharmacology book but has no nursing diagnoses.

Ok, I don't work for whomever publishes these books! (Springhouse) And they are a little expensive at about $40 a pop. But they are very easy to learn from.

Did you read Norma Methany's "Fluid and Electrolyte Balance" book? I thought it was clear and much easier to get through than the McCance text - although McCance is great for the kind of detail which I expect you need when you do the FNP level patho and pharm.

Good luck!

XIGRIS

Specializes in DNAP Student.

I really appreciate your reply, that makes things a little bit more simple for me, you put it in a way that i could really understand. the pharm book that we have for this class tries to confuse you by nameing something one way and then naming the same thing something else which adds alot of confusion to the whole thing. the workbook isnt all that great either the pharm teacher said she didn't like it either, but we couldn't use the same book as the RN's. do you mind if i write back! thanks the help is appreciated, if not thanks for the information.:)

sure anytime

Hi XIGRIS?

You have made this course seem like a tip off the iceberg. I am planning on attening CNA class in Feb, and my greatest nightmare is chemistry and all it's branches.

After reading your post you seem to be a very good basic teacher. I have an MBA from Uk, but looking at changing into the Nursing profession, for so many reasons.

I would appreciate it if you could assist me if I need some tutorials in any chemical related course.

Thanks

CNA1

Pharmacology is a broad topic but I'll site some salient features.

When one studies pharmacology, one deals with any substances that interact with living systems thru chemical processes. One substance thats the core of pharm is drug. When you stduy drug, you study the Phamacokinetics ( what the body do the drugs like absorption, distribution, meatablosim and elimination ) and the Pharmacodynamics ( what the drug does to the body ).

Just an FYI, majority of the drugs are weak acids and weak bases but most of this drugs that are bases are shipped/manufactured ACIDIFIED ( ie: addition of hydrochoride ). Without acidification, an ordinary Tylenol with tear the stomach up because of increasing pH in the stomach. I know this part was not taught to me in nursing school.

Regarding the Parasympathetic and sympathetic effects of the drug.... Ok each organ system has different effects. Sometimes I guess you just need to memorize them there is no easy way out. I can tell you all the effects however, this would be a long discussion and I'm afraid they wont allow me. I think a simple way to remember is that the Neurotransmitter for Para is Acetylcholine and the Neurotransmitter for sympathetic is Norepinephrine.

When you increase Acetylcholine transmission you classify it as Cholinergic and if you block it you call it Anticholenergic.

Increase Norepi is termed Adrenergic and if it is blocked it is either called alpha blocker ( all the Zosin ending drugs ), beta blocker ( all your LOL ending drugs ). Majority of the adrenergic drugs are used to increased BP while the blockers are used either to lower BP or to help alleviate MI.

If you have question regarding the Autonomic Nervous System, you can ask me I would be willing to help. You see Pharm is very broad subject.

sure anytime
Hey XIGRIS,

just wanted to let you know that i passed pharm with an 87 , and it was a little tuff. I wanted to let you know that the info that you gave me helped out alot!!!!. i just built off of that. I wish all teachers could simplify things as good as you, im off to med-surg and L&d this next quarter that starts this month on the 13th. just wanted to thank you again.:balloons: :)

good choice got the book and the cd and they really helped the teacher said that alot of the students that had taken the nclex said the same exact questions were on it thanks alot.....:rolleyes:

You probably already know about the "Made Incredibly Easy" series of books - but if not - you can find them at Borders, Barnes and Nobles, and Amazon. For the basic Pathophysiology class I found "Fluids and Electrolytes Made Incredibly Easy" and "Pathophysiology Made Incredibly Easy" to be very useful. They simplify just a bit too much but they are great for giving the core information which you can add more to later.

For basic pharmacology, I found "Nursing Pharmacology Made Incredibly Easy" to be very useful. It has great nursing diagnoses along with the pharmacological information. This was most helpful with case study assignments. Don't get "Clinical Pharmacology Made Incredibly Easy" as it has the same information exactly as the Nursing Pharmacology book but has no nursing diagnoses.

Ok, I don't work for whomever publishes these books! (Springhouse) And they are a little expensive at about $40 a pop. But they are very easy to learn from.

Did you read Norma Methany's "Fluid and Electrolyte Balance" book? I thought it was clear and much easier to get through than the McCance text - although McCance is great for the kind of detail which I expect you need when you do the FNP level patho and pharm.

Good luck!

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