Nurse Educators, Introduce Yourselves!

Posted
by VickyRN VickyRN, MSN, DNP, RN Member Nurse

Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds. Has 16 years experience.

You are reading page 5 of Nurse Educators, Introduce Yourselves!. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

VickyRN, MSN, DNP, RN

Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds. Has 16 years experience. 105 Articles; 5,349 Posts

HI! Graduated in Dec w/ my MSN in nursing Ed and administration. Am currently THE staff development departmetn for our nursing department ii which is for some reason separated from our education department. Am considering getting some sort of certification in addition to my MSN -- any suggestions?

Popping in to say hello and welcome As far as certification or credentialing, you may want to check out this site:

http://www.nursingworld.org/ancc/

VickyRN, MSN, DNP, RN

Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds. Has 16 years experience. 105 Articles; 5,349 Posts

I have taught in ADN programs for the last 13 years. The opportunity has been great and I have benefited from the faculty shortage (since I don't have my MSN yet). I am currently completing an MSN program online so I can continue to teach full-time. I believe students will give you much more respect when you let them know you don't "know everything". Even now it's not uncommon for me tell them "I'm not sure. You see what you can find about it and I will too. Let's compare notes tomorrow." Your attitude is exactly what we need more of in nursing education. It can be a very high stress job, but I bet you'll thrive!

Welcome to our Forum, Terri! :) Very much appreciate your input. 13 years... WOW!!! I am now just starting on my 3rd year of teaching ADN's. Seems like 100 years ago when I began, I have grown, had so many varied experiences, and learned so much. I, like you, am also working on my MSN in a fully online program. The nursing faculty shortage has hit NC suddenly and hard over the past 3 years and BSN's are now the staple in many of the ADN cc programs across the state.

Agree with your advice. I follow the same. Honesty is always the best policy. As a new instructor, I am often learning right alongside my students.

lisajy

lisajy

3 Posts

Hi to all nurse educators. I have been teaching for one year in a state college in WNY. I graduated from this program so it is special to me. I have my MSN and am a Gerontological Nurse Practitioner. It was a difficult year as I had little teaching experience and was kind of thrown in there. I had a lot of support from my coworkers though and I survived. I graduated in 2001 and have mostly worked in Long Term Care and that is my true love, working with the elderly. I have just decided to stay for another year despite having financial difficulties in repaying my substantial eduation debt. We are experiencing a shortage of nurse educators and I would love to hear from others with the same concerns. There are many programs now to help new nurses who decide to go on a education track but I have found nothing to help someone who worked for a few years then decided to teach. I just turned down another position to practice as a NP for a much larger salary. I hope to hear from other educators about my concerns.

barb4575

barb4575

169 Posts

I can't think of another person who would be a better moderator for this forum. I do know in the past year, this Nurse Educator forum did little to assist me with my role as nurse educator. Rarely would new posts be on this forum. However, I learned a great deal from the other forums. I do wish you luck in bringing the educators out to network. It amazes me how little nurse educators want to network. I find it to be one of the largest dilemmas in nursing curriculum and science today.

I completed this past year teaching at the baccalaureate program and survived. It was my second time to teach at this level. I am currently working on my PhD in Education online through Walden University. I will say that so far, my professor and the univeristy have been very impressive. I enjoy networking with other professional educators. Sadly enough, these are not nurses. I tried desperately to gain the interest of other nurse faculty to network, but it just seemed that they were not committed to it. We had professors that wouldn't show up for class or clinical, so surely they were not interested in professional development.

I am not going to get into any battles with anyone over the different levels of nursing education, because personally, I don't think one of them is the right delivery. I do believe that there is a reason why I was happiest teaching at the ADN level in Kansas. I have taught at the baccalaureate level in Missouri and now, Illinois. The BSN programs were so disorganized, unstructured, and personally, unsatisfying. So, it is time now for me to decide which level to teach at next. In the meantime, I will return to nursing practice.

This is my dilemma currently. How are we as nurse educators supposed to assist these new graduate nurses to cope with this current nurse practice situation? I am not sure how many nurse educators remain in practice, but from what I have seen in the midwest, it is very challenging even at my level of expertise and education. Many educators that I know choose to stay away from practice for this very reason. When I think about my students who will soon graduate, I know what they are facing and it saddens me. I would like to help them in this new journey, but I also know that they just have to do it...get the experience and realize that nursing education is lifelong learning. I pray that I have assisted them in coping with this real world of nursing.

Any suggestions would be appreciated...any negativity regarding levels of nursing education will not be taken seriously. Been there, done that on the general discussion board and won't go there again.

Happy Weekend,

Barbara

Hi to all nurse educators. I have been teaching for one year in a state college in WNY. I graduated from this program so it is special to me. I have my MSN and am a Gerontological Nurse Practitioner. It was a difficult year as I had little teaching experience and was kind of thrown in there. I had a lot of support from my coworkers though and I survived. I graduated in 2001 and have mostly worked in Long Term Care and that is my true love, working with the elderly. I have just decided to stay for another year despite having financial difficulties in repaying my substantial eduation debt. We are experiencing a shortage of nurse educators and I would love to hear from others with the same concerns. There are many programs now to help new nurses who decide to go on a education track but I have found nothing to help someone who worked for a few years then decided to teach. I just turned down another position to practice as a NP for a much larger salary. I hope to hear from other educators about my concerns.
Hellllllo Nurse

Hellllllo Nurse, BSN, RN

Has 15 years experience. 3 Articles; 3,563 Posts

Well what type of nurse educators are we talking about? :)

I'm a Peritoneal Dialysis Nurse Educator. I teach pts to do their own peritoneal dialysis treatments.

VickyRN, MSN, DNP, RN

Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds. Has 16 years experience. 105 Articles; 5,349 Posts

Well what type of nurse educators are we talking about? :)

I'm a Peritoneal Dialysis Nurse Educator. I teach pts to do their own peritoneal dialysis treatments.

Any and all nurse educators are welcome! It is amazing the variety and endless opportunities that are present with nursing; this is one of the qualities that I love about nursing. Again, welcome to the forum. Hope you come here often to post.

VickyRN, MSN, DNP, RN

Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds. Has 16 years experience. 105 Articles; 5,349 Posts

It amazes me how little nurse educators want to network. I find it to be one of the largest dilemmas in nursing curriculum and science today.

Hoping to ameliorate this in a small way with this forum. BTW, welcome back, Barb! I have missed you. The "Tips for New Nurse Educators" thread or "Care Plans vs Concept Mapping" sure could use some of your expertise.

VickyRN, MSN, DNP, RN

Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds. Has 16 years experience. 105 Articles; 5,349 Posts

This is my dilemma currently. How are we as nurse educators supposed to assist these new graduate nurses to cope with this current nurse practice situation? I am not sure how many nurse educators remain in practice, but from what I have seen in the midwest, it is very challenging even at my level of expertise and education. Many educators that I know choose to stay away from practice for this very reason. When I think about my students who will soon graduate, I know what they are facing and it saddens me. I would like to help them in this new journey, but I also know that they just have to do it...get the experience and realize that nursing education is lifelong learning. I pray that I have assisted them in coping with this real world of nursing.

Very good question, Barb, and one I agonize over. I tend to be very protective of our soon-to-be graduates or new nurses. Throughout the program, every step of the way, I try to present a realistic viewpoint of the practice environment. I emphasize that the patient is always central, no matter what, and how vitally important our role of patient advocate is. The nurse is the last "check and balance" for the patient, and our advocacy often makes the difference between life or death, or a great outcome versus a lifetime of disability. Often, this advocacy is not recognized nor appreciated, and in many cases the nurses are penalized for doing what is right for the patient.

I also counsel my students to be business savvy, to use the nursing shortage (crisis?) to their advantage and to be VERY choosy where to practice upon graduation. I warn my students NOT to go to certain floors or hospitals. I certainly don't want to see my students becoming burned out in their first one or two years of practice due to a horrible and unsafe working environment.

limandri

limandri

11 Posts

I have been a nurse educator for many years and looking to retire in about 5-6 yrs. Have taught mostly BS undergrads and MS psych mental health. Lately I've been excited about teaching web based courses. Like developing them in such a way that they are friendly and human in spite of the technology.

My question to those who have done web based courses: what do you like and dislike about these courses? I'd like feedback that isn't tied to course evaluations or teacher evaluations, i.e., the stark truth. I'm especially interested in ways to improve this teaching method.

Thanks for your help.

VickyRN, MSN, DNP, RN

Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds. Has 16 years experience. 105 Articles; 5,349 Posts

Hi to all nurse educators. I have been teaching for one year in a state college in WNY. I graduated from this program so it is special to me. I have my MSN and am a Gerontological Nurse Practitioner. It was a difficult year as I had little teaching experience and was kind of thrown in there. I had a lot of support from my coworkers though and I survived. I graduated in 2001 and have mostly worked in Long Term Care and that is my true love, working with the elderly. I have just decided to stay for another year despite having financial difficulties in repaying my substantial eduation debt. We are experiencing a shortage of nurse educators and I would love to hear from others with the same concerns. There are many programs now to help new nurses who decide to go on a education track but I have found nothing to help someone who worked for a few years then decided to teach. I just turned down another position to practice as a NP for a much larger salary. I hope to hear from other educators about my concerns.

Welcome to the Forum. I, too, was "thrown in" to teaching my first year and learned with the sink-or-swim approach. Glad you are in a supportive environment--this makes all the difference in the world. We are having a near critical shortage of nurse educators here in NC, and monies are available here for nurses (both new nurses and those with experience) to pursue the nursing education route in nursing Masters programs. It is frustrating that nurse educators are not recognized with the financial remuneration that we deserve. Not only do NP's, CNS, CNM and others make well over $20-30,000/ year than nurse educators, but the students we graduate often make more money starting out than we do!

VickyRN, MSN, DNP, RN

Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds. Has 16 years experience. 105 Articles; 5,349 Posts

I have been a nurse educator for many years and looking to retire in about 5-6 yrs. Have taught mostly BS undergrads and MS psych mental health. Lately I've been excited about teaching web based courses. Like developing them in such a way that they are friendly and human in spite of the technology.

My question to those who have done web based courses: what do you like and dislike about these courses? I'd like feedback that isn't tied to course evaluations or teacher evaluations, i.e., the stark truth. I'm especially interested in ways to improve this teaching method.

Thanks for your help.

Just want to pop in to say welcome! I have never taught a web-based course (only web-enhanced). I am sure there are others out there who can help you. Anyone?

profjanmc

profjanmc

63 Posts

Hi,

Just intro....

I teach OB clinical at CSU, Sacramento. I have been teaching as a part-time faculty for about 12 or so years.....