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NP or MD? What would be the right choice in my situation?

Okay, so my knowledge is somewhat minimum compared to all of you guys, so please forgive me if I seem naive.

I'm entering college this fall into nursing and the plan has always been to go on and become an NP (DNP, in Iowa it's required that by 2014 all those graduating as NPs must graduate with doctorates) But lately have been toying with the idea of going into pre-med. I think I have the drive, brains, and grades to be able to get into medical school, although I know it is difficult, so in the end that could be a factor.

Based on the following which would you say is a better fit?

  • Am interested in family medicine or peds
  • Have no issue working under someone, but would prefer to work in colaberation and not be made to feel lesser
  • Although I am not interested in either for the money I want to be able to live a comfortable life without worrying about bills
  • Paying for school isn't an issue, I'm lucky enough to have parents willing to pay for all my schooling
  • Although I am more then willing to dedicate a lot of time to my work I want to be able to have a social life and when the time comes be able to spend time with my family
  • Hope to eventually move to Chicago area
  • Have a goal to open a practice one day, but if I understand correctly that is allowed with NPs also.

I know you guys don't personally know me, but any input would be very appreciated. Even just listing some pros and cons of either or your personal experiences.

Thanks a whole bunch!

in Iowa it's required that by 2014 all those graduating as NPs must graduate with doctorates

Where did you find this info? I don't see anything about it on the Iowa BON site, and, while a few academic organizations are proposing that the DNP be required as entry into advanced practice in the near future, I've not heard anything about that actually becoming mandatory yet in any state. If Iowa is "taking the plunge," I'd certainly like to know something specific about that.

Okay, so my knowledge is somewhat minimum compared to all of you guys, so please forgive me if I seem naive.

I'm entering college this fall into nursing and the plan has always been to go on and become an NP (DNP, in Iowa it's required that by 2014 all those graduating as NPs must graduate with doctorates) But lately have been toying with the idea of going into pre-med. I think I have the drive, brains, and grades to be able to get into medical school, although I know it is difficult, so in the end that could be a factor.

Based on the following which would you say is a better fit?

  • Am interested in family medicine or peds
  • Have no issue working under someone, but would prefer to work in colaberation and not be made to feel lesser
  • Although I am not interested in either for the money I want to be able to live a comfortable life without worrying about bills
  • Paying for school isn't an issue, I'm lucky enough to have parents willing to pay for all my schooling
  • Although I am more then willing to dedicate a lot of time to my work I want to be able to have a social life and when the time comes be able to spend time with my family
  • Hope to eventually move to Chicago area
  • Have a goal to open a practice one day, but if I understand correctly that is allowed with NPs also.

I know you guys don't personally know me, but any input would be very appreciated. Even just listing some pros and cons of either or your personal experiences.

Thanks a whole bunch!

I think your choice comes down to this:

1) Do you want the best and most extensive training that will give you the most tools to treat patients and

2)Are you willing to give up some of your social/family life to have that?

If the answer is yes- pursue medical school. If the answer is no, go for the NP.

Elpark: My med term teacher told me this, shes going back to school for her NP before this change takes place.

juan de la cruz, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in APRN, Adult Critical Care.

Elpark: My med term teacher told me this, shes going back to school for her NP before this change takes place.

The DNP issue could likely be specific to Iowa NP programs. There are programs across the country in a number of states that have announced that they will stop offering the Master's degree NP programs by this and that academic year. That limits program options for candidates to NP programs but does not necessarily make it mandatory to get a DNP because of new regulatory requirements. The BON in Iowa does not have a definite announcement on their website but that's not to say that discussion about the issue isn't on their table.

Elpark: My med term teacher told me this, shes going back to school for her NP before this change takes place.

The DNP issue could likely be specific to Iowa NP programs. There are programs across the country in a number of states that have announced that they will stop offering the Master's degree NP programs by this and that academic year. That limits program options for candidates to NP programs but does not necessarily make it mandatory to get a DNP because of new regulatory requirements. The BON in Iowa does not have a definite announcement on their website but that's not to say that discussion about the issue isn't on their table.

Yes -- as far as I know, plenty of folks are talking about this, and plenty of schools are converting their MSN programs into DNP programs. But that's very different from it being mandatory anywhere.

I only raised the issue because we get lots of posts here from students (and others) who have been told this is a done deal and it is a requirement, and that's simply not true at this point ...

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