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New RN starting ED Residency in one month. Tips/Advice?

Emergency   (616 Views | 6 Replies)

498 Profile Views; 21 Posts

Hey friends!

So, I graduated RN school in August and have been working at the Radiation/Oncology office that I worked at since becoming an LPN 2 years ago. Just a bit of back history.. I completed my preceptorship in an ED, and I worked in a pediatric ED for 2 years as a CNA/Tech. 

I interviewed and was offered a position in a local ED and will be starting my residency the beginning of February. I know there are general classes, and then specialized department classes and eventually you are paired with a preceptor in your department for a couple of months and eventually work to being completely independent. All the while knocking out certifications..

Do you have any advice or tips that you wish you had known? I feel in general prepared and I adapt pretty easily to new situations and am overall excited to finally be an RN in an ED but just looking for any information that may not necessarily be as easily found online.

I am working night shift as well, so any advice as far as nights go is also appreciated! I will be working (4) 10 hour shifts one week, and 3 the following. Once I am out of probation and positions open up I will be trying to switch to 12 hour shifts.

 

Thanks!

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PeakRN specializes in Adult and pediatric emergency and critical care.

533 Posts; 5,667 Profile Views

Know your limits, know your emergency drugs and procedures, learn when to say no.

Take advantage of every learning opportunity.  Don't be afraid to ask questions. Don't be afraid to talk to the Docs.

Don't get abused, but don't immediately withdraw from the harsh advise of the old-timers.

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21 Posts; 498 Profile Views

12 hours ago, PeakRN said:

Know your limits, know your emergency drugs and procedures, learn when to say no.

Take advantage of every learning opportunity.  Don't be afraid to ask questions. Don't be afraid to talk to the Docs.

Don't get abused, but don't immediately withdraw from the harsh advise of the old-timers.

Great thank you!

I started studying up on common ED meds that I found on here. That is definitely my weakness going in.

Impostor syndrome about to set back in... 

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12 Followers; 3,945 Posts; 29,948 Profile Views

I agree with the above advice. There are a lot of time pressures and a lot of tasks. As you are learning all the details, always strive toward an understanding of the big picture...what are the likely things that could be going on with the patient? Although you will have to learn many steps/procedures/processes etc. to care for your patients, don't forget to have an idea about what is going on that goes beyond "need troponin," "needs a CXR," "needs bipap"....etc.

Best of luck!

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21 Posts; 498 Profile Views

On 1/3/2020 at 5:20 PM, JKL33 said:

I agree with the above advice. There are a lot of time pressures and a lot of tasks. As you are learning all the details, always strive toward an understanding of the big picture...what are the likely things that could be going on with the patient? Although you will have to learn many steps/procedures/processes etc. to care for your patients, don't forget to have an idea about what is going on that goes beyond "need troponin," "needs a CXR," "needs bipap"....etc.

Best of luck!

Thank you for this advice! I will be sure to keep this in the back of my head as I am learning. I really appreciate it

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barbslays66 is a ASN and specializes in Emergency.

1 Post; 27 Profile Views

PRIORITIZATION. Don't be afraid to ask for help when you need it, know your limit, and offer help when you can. 

Ask plenty of questions (no question is stupid and we're always learning) and jump in when procedures have to be done - foleys/cath's, NG tubes, assisting with central lines/chest tubes/etc, 18+g IV access, code blues, etc. As well as meds/drips/transfusions - insulin, tPA, heparin, amiodarone, blood, abx's, pressors, etc. That's how you learn. 

Be on point with your charting - don't use a lot of fluff, chart what's important (EMS report and anything that would contribute to the pt's status/symptoms. If you have scribes I would suggest looking at their notes to get an idea) and be clear and concise. Make sure to know your hospital's policies on charting for meds/procedures. An accurate medical, surgical, family (I mainly go in-depth for cardiac/stroke and if I suspect kidney stones) and social history and medication list is VERY important too. Also, make sure to ask for the patient's PCP/Cardiologist/Oncologist/Nephrologist/etc for the docs (they'll thank you big time).

But besides that, know that you're going to be uncomfortable, which is GOOD, and that everyone was new and felt the same way. Don't think you know everything - because you don't and frankly, no one does, medicine is forever evolving and we're always learning.

Also, don't let yourself be abused because you are new. Stand up for yourself and do not allow other nurses and the docs to walk all over you.

You got this 🙂

 

Edited by barbslays66

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SweetSouthernLove has 3 years experience and specializes in Operating Room.

124 Posts; 3,387 Profile Views

Pray!.. No I am kidding! But no seriously..Listen to these lovely nurses and have some fun saving those lives! 🙂

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