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New PCT at Fresenius... what to expect?

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eheml eheml (New) New

I was just hired as a PCT with Fresenius. I have CNA experience but no dialysis experience. I begin the 12-week training next week and am beyond excited! However the training site is a 2 hour drive from where I live! What exactly should I expect my first few days? Will I get to finish training at my clinic after a few weeks or will I be commuting the entire three months?

very busy specially during turn over. very tiring too.. if you have a lot of patience then you will survive... good luck..

What is the 12 week training like? I worked at a family practice before this so busy is my forte lol.

oh my, i don't know how to explain it cause i use to work in another country. but let me share you this: btw it depends on the dialysis clinic u are working. is it hospital or clinic?

although i'm only a PCT in our dialysis clinic i have a staff nurse(medical-surgical private hospital) experience in another country.

Im still waiting for my authorization to test and i hope i will get my license SOON because i think DIALYSIS is really not for me! it sounds like we have a time limit per patient, They want us to hook each patient for 5-10 minutes and then go to the next patient. it's all about rushing! now where is the patient's safety there? i cannot practice compassion or empathy because we always have to rush. lol

PCT's in our dialysis clinic also act as BIOMED, we do the bicarb mixing at the back while doing patient care and shut down the clinic(rinsing the large tanks, closing it) if you have the 2pm-10:30pm shift. every saturday we also have to do the bleaching of the large tanks at the back and very tiring because i'm just alone doing the back shut down and it means I have to stay longer to make sure after i bleached the tanks, we have to rinse and make sure it's clear and free from bleach after testing it with a strip(i have to work 2pm-11:30pm if I'm doing the bleach saturday shutdown).

sorry for ranting here, maybe i was just used to floor nursing in our country that's why i don't like the way of the dialysis clinics here. we use to have 14 patients per nurse back home and it's a private hospital, not even government, it was hard but i was still able to manage because there is no time limit, though we have to act fast too. i've only been working for 1 year in our clinic but somehow i got use to their technique. also the good part in our clinic are my co-workers and patients, they're all friendly and nice, i love them!

but i'm still hoping i can get a hospital job someday(although i know it's more hard in the hospital) and i really think it depends on the interest where we can excel..

but don't worry, i think it really depends on the clinic. if it's a large clinic then for sure you have BIOMED tech's there to do the work. also since you are just training they won't teach you yet how to shut down the clinic and do the bleaching every saturday.. lol

i also don't have a dialysis experience before i was hired in our clinic but the 12 weeks training was really good because you still got the preceptor. but after the training and you are on your own that's where the reality sets in. you just have to be patient because there will still be patients that are rude or grumpy. i just try to understand them because i know they are sick and most of them are still depressed specially if they are new to dialysis and come to think of it, who wants to be poked 3 times a week with that large bore needle! some patients will also not trust new PCT's because they are scared you might make a mistake in poking them so they will request other PCT.

the technique there is you just have to be really friendly and explain to them that you will do your best. there are times that you will feel EXHAUSTED specially during turn over of patients because everything should be fast but SURE and SAFE... but since you are new just take your time, don't rush. once you've learned everything like setting up the machine, programming it, preparing heparin etc then speed will come after. you just have to learn the basics of dialysis then you're good to go.. =)

Edited by liamia

Wow that's crazy! I agree though, time may be a huge factor but safety is more important! I am in an outpatient clinic and would work MWF 5-5 and most likely 4 hours on Saturday. That's a huge reason why I'm looking forward to the training, competence is a biggie. Hopefully I can surprise some patients and show them that the newbie knows a few things lol. I have also heard that dialysis is a challenge so I'm interested to see what it is like.

Hospital nursing is a different world, I have major respect for nurses who have the stamina and patience to work in a hospital, especially the ER. Best of luck to you!

Wow that's crazy! I agree though, time may be a huge factor but safety is more important! I am in an outpatient clinic and would work MWF 5-5 and most likely 4 hours on Saturday. That's a huge reason why I'm looking forward to the training, competence is a biggie. Hopefully I can surprise some patients and show them that the newbie knows a few things lol. I have also heard that dialysis is a challenge so I'm interested to see what it is like.

Hospital nursing is a different world, I have major respect for nurses who have the stamina and patience to work in a hospital, especially the ER. Best of luck to you!

It is really challenging.. :yes: i was not prepared when i took it and i believe this job is for the tough ones because it's mentally, emotionally and physically exhausting(physically draining in the sense that you do all the physical work and be jack of all trades like doing the biomed role).

RN's role in the dialysis clinic is to supervise and give meds because they have 24 patients. they also have a lot of paperwork, so you're considered lucky if your charge nurse will help you but usually they will not help you even if you're behind with other patients because their busy assessing. though if it's really an emergency like life threatening they will help you. the PCT's and LPN are the ones who do the actual dialysis and we have to do interventions once they experience hypotension, cramping, hypertension etc.. i think you can make it since you're use to a busy facility before.. :)

i also just wanna share with you when i was still a trainee: so for the first 2 weeks it's all about learning and studying the basics of dialysis in the classroom. then 10 weeks will be on the floor setting up machines, preparing dialyzers, pack and heparin. Your preceptor will encourage you to set up machine in 3 minutes which is very overwhelming at first but the more u practice and the longer you do it, you will learn that it is achievable.. LOL

just message me here if you have other questions and don't be discourage if at first you're having a hard time. the first 3- 6 months will really be TOUGH and hard because you are a newbie and just starting to learn techniques.. good luck! hope you will share your experience too once u start. :up:

iHeartRN1031

Specializes in Nephorology. Has 1 years experience.

@eheml-Good luck being a PCT. Every FMC clinic is different. It's hard to compare one another. Yes, indeed, it's fast paced, just be ready to keep up the pack:). The 12-week training is good, learn as much as you can, and ask questions if you need to. There's so much to learn . BTW, which FMC clinic you'll be working? I used to be a PCT. I was a CNA for 5 yrs before joining FMC as PCT. Then I pursue nursing while working as a PCT. It's a great company. There's a lot of opportunity.