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New Grad to NP program?

Nurses   (665 Views | 4 Replies)
by RNICU09 RNICU09 (New) New

296 Profile Views; 5 Posts

Hi all, I am a recent BSN grad in December 2016. I worked as a float Student Nurse in the hospital I work in now for 2 years throughout school, and started working in the ICU right after I got my license (February 2016). I am thinking about starting an FNP program online in the fall. I work full time currently and plan to work full/part time throughout school. The program is 2-3 years. What is everyone's opinion on this?! Can I do it? Will I be able to find a position with 3 years ICU experience as an FNP? I just have a lot of questions, so any input is great! I appreciate your honesty. Thank you :-)

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18 Posts; 678 Profile Views

FNP's are in high demand, you'll find a position in anything you seek, just apply yourself. Be confident. Healthcare is all about cutting costs and maximizing profits so positions such as NP, PA, PT/OT/ Speech Therapists etc. is projected to grow drastically.

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KatieMI has 7 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine.

2 Followers; 1 Article; 2,644 Posts; 44,005 Profile Views

Full time FNP program takes at least 30 hours/week studying/clinicals/classes which is compatible with work, but most commonly not full time. Some (usually better) programs ask students to sign a pledge not to go over 24h/week. I worked 1 to 2 shifts/week with 20+ hours clinicals and 14 credits/semester, although I must say that, with family on board, life sucked a whole lot.

Part time programs take more time, about 3.5 to 4.5 years, but one can work full time through them.

Employers seem to be minimally concerned with previous bedside experience, and FNP programs usually are not concerned about it at all as long as applicant has it, if it is required. My program has students from NICU to LTC. So, your ICU experience won't be a drawback. ICU can be a bit of pain in (you know where) if you go to a place where you are responsible for finding your own preceptor. In ICU, you mostly contact with intensivists and specialists, so finding your first contact (which can open doors for the rest of them if you do good there) can be tough, especially if your school limits type of providers and forces you to have only NPs as preceptor. Finding your own preceptor has its own positives, so do not discard programs basing only on this, but do not forget to ask these questions on interview. Meanwhile, be super-uber-nice and useful with internists and especially NP/PAs working in your unit.

Edited by KatieMI

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5 Posts; 296 Profile Views

Thank you very much for your help! I was planning to go part-time once the clinical portion began. For the program I was planning to do, I have to find my own preceptors, which I think will be difficult but doable. Thanks again!

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