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New Grad in CA with an ADN

First Year   (428 Views | 2 Replies)
by April5 April5 (New) New

62 Profile Views; 1 Post

Let me preface this by saying that I am extremely grateful that I am starting a new grad RN position in the Los Angeles area during this time. But I'm not quite sure if I'll be happy in this position. The pay is not the best compared to surrounding hospitals, but the staff are great and always willing to help.

I graduated with an ADN in Dec 2019, took the NCLEX late Feb, and I just started in a new grad med surg/tele position. I was working as a transporter at my current hospital for a little over a year. I became good friends with the charge nurse and directors of the med surg/tele floor where I usually drop off patients post-op. This sounds really stupid but, this position was basically handed to me so I felt obligated to accept it. I'm grateful that I have a guarantee job, especially during the COVID19 crisis it seems most hospitals in my area have either stopped hiring new grads completely (especially those without a BSN) or postponed new graduate programs until further notice.

Many other nurses at this hospital have told me that my current unit is the best place to start as a new grad. However, I have always wanted to work in the ER/ICU/OR. My plan is to work at this job for a year while completing my BSN online then figure out what to do next. I feel like a horrible person for using this job as a stepping stone! Can anyone offer me any advice or share their experiences?

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speedynurse is a RN, EMT-P and specializes in ER.

91 Posts; 346 Profile Views

Honestly, it is OK to have goals. I would definitely try to stay on the floor for a year because it costs a bundle to train a new grad and it is important to be fair to the unit. However, there are plenty of floor nurses that start there to gain experience, then move on.

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ocean.baby has 25 years experience and specializes in corrections and LTC.

119 Posts; 2,351 Profile Views

Every unit has its ups and downs. You will learn time management skills that will benefit you in any job you do in the future. You will learn basics and have them out of the way and that will be a benefit to you when you move to a different unit. This is a great way for you to start out, in a year or so when you move to a different unit you will see the difference between you and new grads that are on that unit.

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