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Need to travel a lot - Can I work as a CRNA?

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Hello All,

I have benefitted tremendously on this website, but I need to ask the following question.

I am 100% sure in my heart and soul that I want to be a CRNA (I am still just a nursing student, but trying to plan things). BUT... I need to be able to travel a lot - that is a major goal for me. So, if you leave the field of work for a number of years (as many as five for instance) and then come back and want to get a job at a different hospital etc - can you do that without a problem? Or do they consider you as being out of practice for too long?

I have also noticed that while nursing itself is in huge demand all over the world, CRNAs are not used in a lot of countries, and they stick to just MD Anesthesiologists and Anesthesiologist Techs. That was discouraging to me at first, but I want to see if I can just travel without working...

Thanks a bunch to whoever answers this question with some insightful info!!

tonyccrn

Specializes in MICU.

hmmm not sure about the long time off from jobs, especially as a crna, the anesthesia field is advancing so quickly (so im told), that if you took off 5 years that might be tough.

on second note, if you heart is not set on it 100% this is probably not the profession for you. i know people who "heart" was not set on it, all they did was waste alot of money and time in pursuing it and then quiting half way through it.

just my opinion, im sure others may differ.

tony.

PinsAndNeedles

Specializes in ICU/ CCU, Oncology ICU. Has 10 years experience.

Seems that if you want the flexibility of time-off and traveling to different countries, you should look more into a career in travel nursing. You'll have far more international assignments that are available to you and the flexibility to work when you want to.

Also, if you are truly dedicated to becoming a CRNA, the military has a great need for CRNAs. The training is free w/ a time commitment of active duty service and you can travel within the U.S./ international stations (Europe, Hawaii, Korea, etc.) Not for everyone, but a viable option just the same. :twocents:

Good luck to you :up:

Just to clarify - my heart IS set on it 100%.

I just need to hear from someone who has taken an absence from work as a CRNA - how did you get back in the job market - even if it was just a year for example?

Thanks All

wtbcrna, MSN, DNP, CRNA

Specializes in Anesthesia.

Hello All,

I have benefitted tremendously on this website, but I need to ask the following question.

I am 100% sure in my heart and soul that I want to be a CRNA (I am still just a nursing student, but trying to plan things). BUT... I need to be able to travel a lot - that is a major goal for me. So, if you leave the field of work for a number of years (as many as five for instance) and then come back and want to get a job at a different hospital etc - can you do that without a problem? Or do they consider you as being out of practice for too long?

I have also noticed that while nursing itself is in huge demand all over the world, CRNAs are not used in a lot of countries, and they stick to just MD Anesthesiologists and Anesthesiologist Techs. That was discouraging to me at first, but I want to see if I can just travel without working...

Thanks a bunch to whoever answers this question with some insightful info!!

It would be extremely hard to re-enter nursing or nurse anesthesia after a 5yr absence. Here is website that you might find interesting. http://ifna-int.org/ifna/page.php?46 CRNAs practice in several countries, but I have no idea about working abroad as a CRNA. Another consideration is working on humanitarian missions as a CRNA in different countries.

FLTraumaRN

Specializes in Trauma ER and ICU...SRNA now. Has 14 years experience.

You can also take jobs when you are a CRNA as a locum tenens position. They can be all over the country. They vary from a couple of days to months. It would give you the flexibility to travel and possibly the time off you want. If you are 100% sure you want to be a CRNA, then I say go for it!! You will find a way to work that out when the time comes.

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