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NEED HELP preparing for PICU job

Specializes in ICU. Has 1 years experience.

Hello!

I am starting a job in the PICU in a couple weeks at a large level 1 trauma hospital. I have one year of experience in an adult trauma surgical ICU at a smaller level 1 trauma hospital. I have reached out to the PICU managers and haven't been told very much on what to expect, just that the children are very sick. I was told to be prepared to learn a lot. I will not be taking cardiovascular cases for a couple years. So, what do you awesome PICU nurses recommend I do to prepare for this job? Should I familiarize myself with the developmental stages of children? Should I read up on pediatric specific diseases? I heard Mary Hazinski’s 'Manual of Pediatric Critical Care’ is a good reference.

Background: I have limited experience with children (don't have kids), but did work as a private nanny and at a daycare for a couple years during college. I did my pediatric rotation in nursing school two years ago, but since then haven't had any peds exposure.

Thank you for any advice! 😁

HiddencatBSN, BSN

Specializes in Peds ED. Has 9 years experience.

Developmental stages and typical norms is always good. Normal vital signs by age. I started in peds as a new grad so reviewed my nursing school lecture slides from peds.

(sorry, submitted too soon)

I think you’ll learn a lot about the pathophys of the patients you’ll take care of on orientation so starting with a solid understanding of what is normal/typical for each developmental stage will help you recognize more quickly when something is abnormal.

Edited by HiddencatBSN

HannahBSN, RN

Specializes in ICU. Has 1 years experience.

On 8/21/2020 at 7:13 AM, HiddencatBSN said:

Developmental stages and typical norms is always good. Normal vital signs by age. I started in peds as a new grad so reviewed my nursing school lecture slides from peds.

(sorry, submitted too soon)

I think you’ll learn a lot about the pathophys of the patients you’ll take care of on orientation so starting with a solid understanding of what is normal/typical for each developmental stage will help you recognize more quickly when something is abnormal.

Thank you for your input!

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