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Need Help PLS! Sitter @ Hospital Orientation!

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Hi,

I have been trying to find a job and I think my search has come to an end. I have applied for Hospital Sitter position to work near were I live. I went for a drug test, I have CPR certification and they also asked for my CHHA License. Now, my question is What do I need to expect do or not do for orientation? I know that as a sitter I need to watch over the patient and make sure is safe at all times my shift is from 11pm-7am and every other weekend. I am really excited yet very nervous because is first time I will do this. Help please advice on what to do, and what not to do anyone working at overlook or near by? Also I will be pay $10 p/h and require to do over time I was told.

Thanks in Advance!:)

Edited by sirI

are u an RN/LPN?

No, I am not. Why do you ask?

I'm guessing the question was asked because this is primarily a nursing website. Other people are allowed to post, but most members are nursing students or nurses. It's also a byproduct of this tough economy that many new LPNs and RNs can't find employment as nurses, so they are taking jobs as sitters, techs, and CNAs. The important factor here is that regardless of their job title, they will still be held to the higher standards of their training.

As for your new job, it's important that you nail down the job description and find out whether you're allowed to read or do other simple activities while you sit. This is especially important on night shift.

The human brain is wired to shut down (fall asleep) in the absence of meaningful stimuli. Wiser employers are finally beginning to understand that sitters will actually be likely to stay more alert if they're engaged in some low-level task like reading or watching a TV on low (as long as it doesn't bother the patient) than if they are expected to sit in near dark conditions with nothing to occupy their minds.

Even though I'm an RN, I sometimes float to another floor as a sitter. I make sure to always have a good book with me, and I take a small flashlight in case the lowest room light still bothers the patient.

I have never had a problem with missing something the patient was doing, and I've had some interesting talks with patients who may have been disoriented enough to need a sitter but still with it enough to remember great stories. I've also watched over patients who were completely oriented but who had made suicide threats and needed to have someone with them around the clock for the first 24 hours. I used to work psych, so this is not at all intimidating to me. Lots of times, patients are grateful for a listening ear.

Be attuned to changes in your patient--increase in agitation or anxiety, odd-sounding breathing, attempts to get out of bed, need for toileting, etc.--and report them to the nurse.

And don't leave the room or become so distracted that you lose track of why you're there.

Best wishes.

I'm guessing the question was asked because this is primarily a nursing website. Other people are allowed to post, but most members are nursing students or nurses. It's also a byproduct of this tough economy that many new LPNs and RNs can't find employment as nurses, so they are taking jobs as sitters, techs, and CNAs. The important factor here is that regardless of their job title, they will still be held to the higher standards of their training.

As for your new job, it's important that you nail down the job description and find out whether you're allowed to read or do other simple activities while you sit. This is especially important on night shift.

The human brain is wired to shut down (fall asleep) in the absence of meaningful stimuli. Wiser employers are finally beginning to understand that sitters will actually be likely to stay more alert if they're engaged in some low-level task like reading or watching a TV on low (as long as it doesn't bother the patient) than if they are expected to sit in near dark conditions with nothing to occupy their minds.

Even though I'm an RN, I sometimes float to another floor as a sitter. I make sure to always have a good book with me, and I take a small flashlight in case the lowest room light still bothers the patient.

I have never had a problem with missing something the patient was doing, and I've had some interesting talks with patients who may have been disoriented enough to need a sitter but still with it enough to remember great stories. I've also watched over patients who were completely oriented but who had made suicide threats and needed to have someone with them around the clock for the first 24 hours. I used to work psych, so this is not at all intimidating to me. Lots of times, patients are grateful for a listening ear.

Be attuned to changes in your patient--increase in agitation or anxiety, odd-sounding breathing, attempts to get out of bed, need for toileting, etc.--and report them to the nurse.

And don't leave the room or become so distracted that you lose track of why you're there.

Best wishes.

Hi thanks for taking some time to reply. I am not a student or a nurse. I just wanted some advice and since I will be working with nurse well what best place then this website? Anyways I appreciate your words believe me when I say I don't really like the idea of just watching a patient and sitting I love being busy because that keeps you from thinking about when is time to go home. My problem is that I have been out from work for almost 2 years having 2 kids makes it harder for me to find a good job during the day, but I will definetly ask the nurse if there is anything I can do while in the room. Sitter is similar to CHHA difference is that at least being a CHHA you don't have to be all day in same patient house and you get do cleaning, shopping, and all of that which is great time flies. Any how I have read a lot of negative and little positive things about sitters so I hope everything works well. Again thanks and take care.

Edited by sirI

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