Jump to content

MS vs MSN

CRNA   (8,039 Views 10 Comments)
by jesset2 jesset2 (Member) Member

1,339 Profile Views; 29 Posts

What is the difference between getting an MS vs a MSN in Nurse Anesthesia. Are you considered an Advanced Pracitce Nurse with either one? How does this affect employment and salary status?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Myxel67 has 15 years experience and specializes in Diabetes ED, (CDE), CCU, Pulmonary/HIV.

463 Posts; 5,391 Profile Views

I'm not sure you can get and MS. All the CRNAs I know went through the MSN program at a nursing school and followed the CRNA track as opposed to ARNP in adult care, pediatric care, or obstetrics/midwifery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

462 Posts; 5,992 Profile Views

What is the difference between getting an MS vs a MSN in Nurse Anesthesia. Are you considered an Advanced Pracitce Nurse with either one? How does this affect employment and salary status?

MS = Master of Science

MSN = Master of Science in Nursing

You don't really get a MSN in Nurse Anesthesia. It would be called a MSNA. You are an advanced practice nurse with a masters degree in nursing. No effect that I can tell on employment and salary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ICRN2008 has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Infection Preventionist/ Occ Health.

897 Posts; 8,128 Profile Views

The nurse practitioner program I am attending awards a Master's of Science with a concentration in nursing- technically it is an MS. According to our dean of academic affairs, the difference lies in how the board of regents at the university chooses to title the degree. There is no difference between MS and MSN programs (or BS or BSN programs for that matter) with regards to accreditation or eligibility for certification or licensing exams.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

piper_for_hire specializes in SRNA.

494 Posts; 3,769 Profile Views

As far as working as an anesthetist, a MS or MSN will have no bearing. I interviewed at one program that was a MS program and they told me it would only be an issue if I decided to go into teaching as many CRNA programs require an MSN to teach.

-S

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

77 Posts; 2,190 Profile Views

Yes, you can have an MS. My program awards a Masters in Biology. My school was affiliated with a university and a hospital, not a nursing school.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

29 Posts; 1,339 Profile Views

I ask this because my school offers an MS in nurse anesthesia and my friend's school offesr an MSN and the faculty at my friend's school are saying that those with an MS in nurse anesthesia cannot be considered advanced practice nurses unless they take certain courses (one of which is informatics) that those with an MSN take. She's in school in Philadelphia, I'm in New York.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

piper_for_hire specializes in SRNA.

494 Posts; 3,769 Profile Views

I'm guessing you're talking about Naz, which I believe is the only MS program around here. I'm not sure what "being considered and advanced practice nurse" means here. Clearly it doesn't matter for practicing anesthesia. Everyone that graduates from Naz program and passes the boards is a CRNA.

-S

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

japaho41 specializes in MICU & SICU.

280 Posts; 4,100 Profile Views

It depends on the school that you attend. For instance Univ South Carolina awards Masters of Nurse Anesthesia, there program is under the medical school and not the nursing school, hence the change in the type of degree awarded. So really, what is the difference in a degree? The only advantage of an MSN is if you would wish to pursue further education.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×