Licensing when not working

Nurses General Nursing

Published

Hello,

I am new to allnurses. I am curious....If you are a RN and renew your license every two years and do your CEU's but don't work as a RN (for example staying at home with kids) you never lose your license as a RN correct? I am currently a stay at home mom to a new baby after working * months as a RN (have 10 years medical experience) and probably won't work till my son is a bit older. I know I will probably have to start out as a new grad nurse again but just wanted to make sure there is no way my license can be revoked because I was not working as a RN for a few years, as long as I keep it current. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Another example would be if I work as a Registered Dietician and keep my RN license current. I could hold the title RD, RN correct? even though I am not actively working as a nurse? I could go back to nursing later correct, even if it has been years since working actively as a RN?

Thanks! :wink2:

elkpark

14,633 Posts

Like everything else about nursing, the requirements vary somewhat from state to state, so check with your BON to get the specifics for your state. I believe that some states require you work/practice some minimum amount of hours in order to maintain an active license. You may also be required to complete a "refresher course" when you want to return to practice, depending on how long you were away from nursing.

Of course you can be both an RD and an RN, as long as you meet the requirements to maintain both credentials. The time you spend working as an RD won't count as hours of nursing practice, of course, and vice versa ... (You don't actually sign "RD, RN" after your name, do you? Why bother to use more than the credential for the job you're actually working at the time?)

Be aware that you will not be a v. competitive/attractive job candidate after staying home for a number of years, esp. with the minimal amount of experience you have now, and you will have a very hard time getting facilities to treat you as a "new grad" (you may have a very hard time finding a job, period). A lot of people work at least a minimum amount of part-time hours while raising their kids in order to avoid being completely out of nursing for an extended period -- that's something to consider.

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