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Liability for an LPN working as a PCA

South Carolina   (1,258 Views 7 Comments)
by bornfree7777 bornfree7777 (New Member) New Member

330 Visitors; 4 Posts

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I am an LPN and am doing Supervisory Visits for PCAs in a home care agency.

I am also considering filling in as a substitute as a PCA. My question is, what is my liability as an LPN if I choose to do this. Like for instance if an emergency arises and I have to use skills that are not in the PCA job description will this put my license on the line.

Do you think it is a wise idea to work in a PCA role as an LPN?

I have called LLR several times and sent the emails with no response. I looked on there web site for laws and policies and and did not come up with anything. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

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RNNPICU has 13 years experience.

63 Likes; 11,680 Visitors; 868 Posts

If anything happens you would be held to the level of your license, because you are a LPN. Even though you are serving in a role under your license, you would still be held to the level of an LPN

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Alex Egan has 9 years experience and works as a Peds PDN.

27 Likes; 6 Articles; 22,614 Visitors; 830 Posts

What risk are you perceiving here? Even if you just doing basic care, you're still a nurse. Don't do anything a reasonable competent nurse wouldn't do. What risk are you perceiving here? Even if you just doing basic care, you're still a nurse. Don't do anything a reasonable competent nurse wouldn't do, and there will be no problem.

Maybe if you'd be more articulate what about what risks you're concerned about. But I'm guessing you don't really know, it's just this tired line of my license is at risk. As a general rule if you want to keep your license safe do the following: don't do anything outside your scope of practice; do not practice medicine; do not steal narcotics; do not drink and drive; do not corrupt minors; Do not falsify documentation.

Edited by Alex Egan

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330 Visitors; 4 Posts

What I mean by risk is for instance if say an emergency happens requiring a nursing intervention. For instance someone is having angina and needs a couple of nitro, the family caregiver is not present. Client has a heart attack, It is then brought to court. Would I not be held liable for not intervening?

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Alex Egan has 9 years experience and works as a Peds PDN.

27 Likes; 6 Articles; 22,614 Visitors; 830 Posts

Why would you not intervene? If the NTG is present with orders and parameters then you would give it. You are a nurse. Just because you are working as a PCA you are NOT relieved of your knowledge and duty to act.

If you didn't give the required medication and harm resulted you would be held liable because you didn't do what a reasonable and prudent nurse wound in this situation

Im not trying to be rude. I put myself in these situations all the time when I'm working as an EMT, you have to do what is right and accept that your employer may not like it.

Edited by Alex Egan

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330 Visitors; 4 Posts

What you said makes it a little more clear, I will have to make my employer aware of this, If they still want me to fill in under the condition that I have have to use my nursing skills if necessary. Where it gets muddy is that this is not a licensed home health agency it is just a home care agency which means they are not licensed to do any skilled care.

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