Jump to content

Leaving NYC to become a Travel Nurse

Travel   (718 Views 5 Comments)
by StacyAtheNurse StacyAtheNurse (Member) Member

2,439 Profile Views; 38 Posts

I was looking for some opinions.

I am an RN in NYC. After traveling to NYC for my first travel assignment, I was offered a perm position and took it. I’ve been here for 5 years. I got married, bought a house, had two children (busy girl I know). However I never got the travel bug out of me, and I want to go back so badly for the past 3 years I’ve been holding the theoretical “gun” but I haven’t pulled the trigger. 
I LOVE where I work, and DONT get it mixed, I would stay per diem here because it’s not easy to get in, but I would like to make more income and I’d like to explore a few particular states I’m interested in moving to before my children are eligible for schools (which is when I’d like to move). I make ok money right now for where I live (in the city), about 102k/annually, which after taxes, and retirement, and healthcare pays $2100/biweekly. 
I see travel rates daily for $1800-$3000 weekly in my specialty, and I see them on a regular consistent basis. But all of the nurses that I’ve seen do this are southern nurses. There is also some floating around agreement that nurses from the north (NYC) probably wouldn’t benefit from travel nursing because we already make so much. 
But I mean, do the math. Just based on my biweekly take home, it seems travel nursing is almost double my pay! 
Are there any Northeastern nurses who have left their “high paying jobs” to become travel nurses?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 Followers; 1 Article; 5,345 Posts; 45,007 Profile Views

Those advertised numbers are total compensation. You will have to pay for housing and insurance. Higher paying assignments are usually where housing costs are the highest. Pretty hard to pencil out an advantage, but you have better reasons to travel than money in your post. Just do it! Ideally, don't worry about the money (other than shopping agencies) but pick ideal locations or clinical compatibility so you can enjoy travel.

You are right keeping your options open with per diem, and explore what maintaining your staff health insurance will cost you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 Followers; 1 Article; 5,345 Posts; 45,007 Profile Views

One other financial thought for you: a good bit of the "great" compensation of travel nurses is the tax free portion for housing and meals. To qualify, you must be traveling for business away from an established tax home and residence. For you, that is NYC. Absent that, all your travel compensation is taxable (you would be an itinerant worker, where anywhere you are is home for tax purposes). Yet to get the favorable tax status, you have to maintain a residence in NYC, which is to say the least, far higher cost than most traveler's home residence costs.

Your recruiter may well tell you that you can "just use a relative's address", and indeed you can. But this is illegal and if you get audited, you will be responsible for back taxes, interest, and penalties. If you are just going to be doing this for a year, the risk may be worthwhile. More than that, definitely not!

So yes, travel is not going to be appealing on a financial perspective to anyone residing in high pay and high housing cost areas of the NE, or the West Coast (including Hawaii and Alaska). In over twenty years of travel, I've never met another traveler from those areas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

38 Posts; 2,439 Profile Views

40 minutes ago, NedRN said:

One other financial thought for you: a good bit of the "great" compensation of travel nurses is the tax free portion for housing and meals. To qualify, you must be traveling for business away from an established tax home and residence. For you, that is NYC. Absent that, all your travel compensation is taxable (you would be an itinerant worker, where anywhere you are is home for tax purposes). Yet to get the favorable tax status, you have to maintain a residence in NYC, which is to say the least, far higher cost than most traveler's home residence costs.

Your recruiter may well tell you that you can "just use a relative's address", and indeed you can. But this is illegal and if you get audited, you will be responsible for back taxes, interest, and penalties. If you are just going to be doing this for a year, the risk may be worthwhile. More than that, definitely not!

So yes, travel is not going to be appealing on a financial perspective to anyone residing in high pay and high housing cost areas of the NE, or the West Coast (including Hawaii and Alaska). In over twenty years of travel, I've never met another traveler from those areas.

Woah, 20 years, that’s very impressive. 
 

I own a duplex in the city, thankfully it’s a multi family and currently my entire extended family lives there. We could air bnb my portion, but the home is still mortgaged in my name. I know a few coworkers that do this with their nyc homes and live up in Connecticut for their kids’ schools. 
 

duplicating expenses is certainly a huge concern for me, which I hope temporary bnb could help. I could also host other travelers, and my uncle, who maintains (construction, plumbing etc) the house anyway, could act as a “property manager” while I am gone. 

Edited by StacyAtheNurse

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 Followers; 1 Article; 5,345 Posts; 45,007 Profile Views

I would try a free consult with TravelTax to check allowable rental use. The general rule is you must have a room that is exclusively yours you can return to at any time. Possible that AirBnB still meets that requirement. There is also a one time rental rule of which I don't know the details. I believe it helps those who exchange houses for some limited amount of time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×