full time or per diem?

  1. Hello you all, I need your help. I often read "full time" or "per diem" in job propositions. Could you explain me what is a per diem nurse and what is the difference with a full time nurse? Thank you very much for reading me.
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    About Dudette

    Joined: Oct '04; Posts: 59; Likes: 3

    10 Comments

  3. by   ProfRN4
    per diem (or prn you may see in print) means you work 'as needed'. you get an hourly rate, usually higher than full time staff (because you do not receive benefits).

    i am per-diem. at the places i work, there is no requirement. some places make you work a certain # of shifts per schedule, some require a certain # of weekend and holiday shifts. i try to pre-schedule my shifts, as the schedule is being made. at times, i will call and see if they need another nurse, and they certainly call me when they fall short.

    the downside: you get no sick, holiday or vacation time. you do not get medical benefits, or tuition reimbursement. if they cancel you (don't need you because they are slow), you don't get paid. you usually need 1-2 yrs experience in the particular field, as the orientation is much shorter than regular staff.

    full time is 36-40 hrs a week (depends on the place). benefits, paid days, and all the perks (and all the headaches of being there ft )
  4. by   Dudette
    Quote from bonemarrowrn
    per diem (or prn you may see in print) means you work 'as needed'. you get an hourly rate, usually higher than full time staff (because you do not receive benefits).

    i am per-diem. at the places i work, there is no requirement. some places make you work a certain # of shifts per schedule, some require a certain # of weekend and holiday shifts. i try to pre-schedule my shifts, as the schedule is being made. at times, i will call and see if they need another nurse, and they certainly call me when they fall short.

    the downside: you get no sick, holiday or vacation time. you do not get medical benefits, or tuition reimbursement. if they cancel you (don't need you because they are slow), you don't get paid. you usually need 1-2 yrs experience in the particular field, as the orientation is much shorter than regular staff.

    full time is 36-40 hrs a week (depends on the place). benefits, paid days, and all the perks (and all the headaches of being there ft )
    thank you very much for answering, you made it clear for me.

    dudette
  5. by   ER1010
    Are you per diem in one specific area: (i.e. OB, NICU, PEDs)

    or are per diem jobs usually just in med-surg?
  6. by   suzanne4
    Quote from Dudette
    Hello you all, I need your help. I often read "full time" or "per diem" in job propositions. Could you explain me what is a per diem nurse and what is the difference with a full time nurse? Thank you very much for reading me.
    As a foreign nurse, you will need to start off with a full-time position for your petition in most cases. Once that contract is completed, then you are free to do whatever, or pick up extra per diem shifts. Depending on how your contract is stated, you may be able to pick up per diem shifts someplace else right wawy. But the petitioning hospital is going to want you full time for awhile, orientation, etc.

    Hope that this helps.....................
  7. by   Dudette
    Hello Suzanne,
    I still have a question. What a surprise, ha ha ha :chuckle !!!
    I am graduated from a school of nursing in France. We do 3 years and 3 months of education to be graduated. So I am wondering how to know if I will be considered as a BSN or a ADN. And if it is ADN, is there a way to become a BSN studiing at home?
    Thank you again for reading me. Your help is really rich.

    Dudette
  8. by   suzanne4
    It depends on the number of hours that you have had and what credits that you received. Each program is different. Even in the US, we still have some Diploma programs that are three years................What title did you school give to you?

    But yes, there are programs that you can do on-line to get your BSN here.
  9. by   Dudette
    Quote from suzanne4
    It depends on the number of hours that you have had and what credits that you received. Each program is different. Even in the US, we still have some Diploma programs that are three years................What title did you school give to you?

    But yes, there are programs that you can do on-line to get your BSN here.
    OK, I understand. But do you know WHO is going to tell me about my status? I just got the NCLEX and received my licence from the State of New York, and nothing about my status (unless "Registered Professional Nurse") appears on my certificate. I saw most of hospitals are preferring BSN degree. My school gave me the title of "Infirmiere Diplomee d'Etat", witch is the last degree before specialties.
    Thank you for having answered me so quickly,
  10. by   suzanne4
    Quote from Dudette
    OK, I understand. But do you know WHO is going to tell me about my status? I just got the NCLEX and received my licence from the State of New York, and nothing about my status (unless "Registered Professional Nurse") appears on my certificate. I saw most of hospitals are preferring BSN degree. My school gave me the title of "Infirmiere Diplomee d'Etat", witch is the last degree before specialties.
    Thank you for having answered me so quickly,
    I would just go ahead and apply for the position that you want, and let the facility make the decision. But the way it looks, you have a Diploma in Nursing. That is what was granted to you. Were any of your classes actually done in a university setting and did oyu receive college credits for them?

    I do not know about the actual programs in France, and each individual program there, but I do know that the Diplomas that are issued in Thailand, are four years and are considered equivlalent to a BSN.

    Unfortunately, there probably isn't anyone to give you a cut and dry answer without knowing your program specifically. You can try contacting the NY BON since they have all of your records and credentials and see what they say.
  11. by   Dudette
    Quote from suzanne4
    I would just go ahead and apply for the position that you want, and let the facility make the decision. But the way it looks, you have a Diploma in Nursing. That is what was granted to you. Were any of your classes actually done in a university setting and did oyu receive college credits for them?

    I do not know about the actual programs in France, and each individual program there, but I do know that the Diplomas that are issued in Thailand, are four years and are considered equivlalent to a BSN.

    Unfortunately, there probably isn't anyone to give you a cut and dry answer without knowing your program specifically. You can try contacting the NY BON since they have all of your records and credentials and see what they say.
    Dear Suzanne,

    I will follow your advice and I will apply for the position I want and see what happens.

    I feel really lucky to be able to discuss with you. This website is so great. I am learning every day about beeing a nurse in America... what a fantastic experience! Thank you for making it easier!
  12. by   suzanne4
    Quote from Dudette
    Dear Suzanne,

    I will follow your advice and I will apply for the position I want and see what happens.

    I feel really lucky to be able to discuss with you. This website is so great. I am learning every day about beeing a nurse in America... what a fantastic experience! Thank you for making it easier!

    You are more than welcome. Glad to be of assistance. Let me know how things turn out for you.

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