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International Nursing Questions

my name is michelle and i am a senior nursing student in massachusetts. i am doing a class project on how our nursing program/nursing in the us compares to that of other countries. if anyone is interested in helping me out could you answer some questions. you don't have to answer all of them as i understand there are a lot.

some of the questions are directed towards nursing students/new grads.

what is your name/age/country/are you a nursing student or rn?

1. how long is your nursing program in your country?

2. do you have a preceptorship rotation to prepare you for being an rn?

3. does your nursing program have any classes on transitioning to the nursing role?

4. does your nursing school specialize at the undergraduate level?

5. do you feel adequately prepared to begin working independently?

6. how long does orientation generally last for your first job? are there new graduate programs?

7. do you have to pass a licensure national exam?

8. how abundant are jobs where you live?

9. do you have a choice about where you get to work?

10. does your nursing program assist you in finding a job once you graduate?

11. what do you feel will be your biggest challenge going into your first job?

12. what options for speciality are available (maternity ect)

13. what is a typical yearly income for a new graduate in your country?

14. how would someone outside of your country be able to come and work in your country?

15. do you feel that you will be respected as a new graduate in your first job, or is that something that must be earned?

16. what are your expectations as a nurse? ( feel autonomous or follow md orders)

ghillbert, MSN, NP

Has 20 years experience. Specializes in CTICU.

1. Three year Bachelor of Nursing degree

2. I am not sure what you mean by that. We did clinicals in various areas, then a structured graduate nurse program after graduating.

3. No, but the graduate nurse program covered that.

4. No.

5. I worked a lot in a nursing home for about 4 years while I was a nursing student, so I felt ready to work after graduation. But I was nervous about learning a specialty for my new ward!

6. New grad program = 1 year. You work 4 days, have classes the 5th day.

7. No. All requirements are fulfilled via the degree and you apply for licensure after finishing.

8. Very bad nurse shortage, particularly in specialties like ICU, and also in rural areas.

9. Of course.

10. The graduate nurse program is administered by a central body that does a computer match; the school assisted us to apply for this.

11. Keeping in mind I graduated 14 years ago, I think the biggest challenge was learning the routine, and how the hospital worked (various departments, ordering tests, documentation etc).

12. Not sure if you mean before or after graduation? If you want to specialise you generally complete a postgraduate certificate (6 months) or a postgraduate diploma (1yr) or a masters (2 yrs) eg. OR, ICU, geriatric, cardiac, maternity etc etc. Specialty rotations in the graduate nurse program were decided by how well you interviewed. You chose 3 preferences (eg. ICU, ER) and they selected you based on the interview rankings. I got to do the second 4 months of my grad program in an ICU.

13. Not sure now, it was around $35K AUD at the time (1997).

14. There are many international nurses working in Australia, I always enjoyed working with them.

15. Respect is always earned, although I expected to be (and was) treated courteously as I built my knowledge. ICU was a steep learning curve, but I didn't have any "nightmare" nurses or managers.

16. I don't think following MD orders and autonomy are dichotomous. Of course I follow MD orders, but over time as you become an expert in your area, you can definitely feel autonomous within your scope. For example, I worked in ICU and although the medicos rounded and decided on goals for the day, it was a collaborative process where they sought my input and adjusted their goals based on that if I had a valid input. I was able to independently adjust/wean inotrope infusions and ventilator settings, extubate, etc.

Thank you so much for replying to my questions, I really appreciate it! They are going to very helpful!

sans33

Specializes in surgical.

I am from asia

1.4 years bachelor

2.yes, instructor are rotated as their speciality and sometime according to need

3.I am not much clear about this question? if u can simplify i will be happy to answer

4.yes, only our school does it in undergrad throughout nation.

5.personally, yes but i m not sure if everybody does

6.initially orientation last for few days, mainly 1 week, and may be that is sufficient, however it is flexible where i worked

7. i did not have to give extra license exam but nowdays they need( new law)

8. jobs are always difficult to find. it depends on your luck

9.probably no, basically we don't want to loose our 1st opportunity so we just grab the firsdt job we get. but if u wish to go with your choice . it may take long

10. no

11.first job is your first step to independence, so its always challenging thinking about how you perform..and how do you handle your stress and pressure.

12. mainly oncology, ICU, CCU, dialysis and OT

13. I really can't say. its variable. it depends upon city u work and dept. working in rural areas pays u alot, almost triple than in capital

14. there are some basic requirement needs to be fulfilled by foreigners in you board. if that meets, you can work as an RN

15. you cannot be sure,you are nurse as a whole... even though there are different level of nursing students.. u donot get respect according to your education. and personally it frustrated me a lot initially, but later i just ignored it thinking people according to thier level

16. I love my profession, and as a nurse one must respect thier profession that lacks in most of us.its a tedious job and people always complaining, howerer i think that ppl should be thinking more about uplifting nursing profession, as nursing is as a whole dominated by other health professions.everybody become confident as they work

hope this will help you

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