How is staffing in pacu? Should there always be at least 2 nurses in the same room at all times?

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I was offered a position as a Recovery nurse for an ambulatory surgery center. In recovery  (California), there should always be 2 licensed professionals in the same room/unit in case of an emergency/code. 
The ASC also has what is called an “office based lab OBL” upstairs apart form the ASC and was told that I would sometimes float upstairs and recover vascular patients from av fistula procedures. I asked if there was going to be another nurse with me and he responded “no”. His argument is that because it’s an “office based lab” they operate differently than an ASC and therefore would not require a 2nd nurse. However, the patient is still receiving sedation (conscious sedation). And this is also something new that has been implemented. 
Can someone clarify? 
 

from aspan.org 
The intent of this standard (having 2 nurses in pacific) is that the qualified Phase I perianesthesia registered nurse who is providing care to a Phase I patient is not left alone with the patient
at any time. The expectation is that the Phase I perianesthesia registered nurse is at the bedside providing direct patient care. The second registered nurse should be able to directly hear a call for assistance AND be immediately available to assist. The qualifications of the second registered nurse should reflect patient acuity as well as the number of patients in the Phase I level of care.

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OR, Nursing Professional Development. Has 17 years experience. 5 Articles; 11,136 Posts

Conscious sedation patients typically do not require Phase I PACU care as they are not receiving anesthesia care (conscious sedation can be administered by an RN with training and competence), and are sent instead directly to Phase II care or even sometimes in the inpatient world directly back to the inpatient unit. You would want to look at the staffing requirements for Phase II instead. The key is going to be will there be assistance readily available? If you hit a panic button, will someone respond?

MakeItRain

MakeItRain

12 Posts

On 1/27/2022 at 4:12 AM, Rose_Queen said:

Conscious sedation patients typically do not require Phase I PACU care as they are not receiving anesthesia care (conscious sedation can be administered by an RN with training and competence), and are sent instead directly to Phase II care or even sometimes in the inpatient world directly back to the inpatient unit. You would want to look at the staffing requirements for Phase II instead. The key is going to be will there be assistance readily available? If you hit a panic button, will someone respond?

Yes, this is correct. Phase II standards of care are generally less, but do still require a second staff member capable of at least BLS