Jump to content

How to introduce change to the ward?

KaeAskavi KaeAskavi (New) New

Hello everyone,

I am currently in my last year of nursing school! My topic of this semester is change. I'm am writing a literature review on how to introduce changes and/or encourage RNs to utilize their resources. I'm looking for articles and I cannot for the life of me find anything on it! How is change introduced to your ward? what is the best way to communicate change without offending anyone?

Thanks in advance!

getoverit, BSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in ER/ICU/Flight. Has 18 years experience.

Introducing change ain't easy.

I think the way that gets hospital administration's attention is the almighty $$. You can present ideas that can potentially improve safety and patient outcomes, but usually you have to include how much actual money will be saved by doing it before anyone will consider implementing your idea.

It's sad but true that most things revolve around the dollar. Even though I personally object, I do accept it as a fact.

Many nursing articles you'll find in a literature review may not be about implementing change per se, but they are about how the need for change was identified and process that followed. I read one recently about pressure ulcers and developing prevention protocols, you could easily extrapolate that information into your project.

Congratulations on being so close to finishing school, good luck with your project.

Change is difficult and you've probably learned that it comes very slowly in the healthcare field. Many long-time healthcare workers are very attached to the way things have "always been done."

You might try looking in healthcare management texts for references. So to successfully introduce change, you need buy in and change agents, right? The idea needs to be presented to end-user staff in a non-intimidating fashion - I usually have "random" conversations with other staff, try to find out their feelings on the subject, and thoroughly educate myself on the process I'm looking to change. Then, I identify end-users who are interested in promoting change and encourage them. I use those "change agents" to promote the change and accept that 1. it will take time, 2. persistence will pay off (if it's a 'good' change), 3. there will always be some people who will not want to change.

Don't know if that's helpful for you or not. Hope it is. Good luck with the project and finishing school!

Nurse_Ziba

Specializes in School Nursing and Sports Medicine.

Based on my experience, the best way to introduce change is by starting from within. You can't expect others to follow if you yourself don't practice what you preach. I work with VERY difficult people and I get really frustrated with their actions. I've tried so many ways of addressing issues and none of it worked. No matter how hard I try to let them see why it is important to change they just don't get it. After 2 years, I've noticed that what monkey see monkey do. So instead of wasting my time trying to see the change in others I would rather exert my efforts in something productive.

By the way. I've read a CE entitled "The power of Change - Nurses make the difference By Maureen Habel, RN, MA". The best part is it's free! Here's the link The Power of Change | CE365-60 > Continuing Education Unit at Nurse.com

Good luck!:heartbeat

Orca, ASN, RN

Specializes in Corrections, psychiatry, rehab, LTC. Has 25 years experience.

I think the way that gets hospital administration's attention is the almighty $$. You can present ideas that can potentially improve safety and patient outcomes, but usually you have to include how much actual money will be saved by doing it before anyone will consider implementing your idea.

If you are seeking something that requires buy-in from administration, I agree. Put a cost figure on it and you have a lot better chance of getting it through. It can be the best idea ever, but unless you can show a fiscal advantage for doing it chances of getting it done are slim.

how to introduce change

Obama poster???? It may not be any change for the better but it'll be some change

×

By using the site you agree to our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies.

OK