Help,,,

Posted
by RN_TOBE RN_TOBE Member

:crying2:

The healthcare provider prescribes an IV solution of Heparin Sodium 25,000 Units in 5% Dextrose injection 500ml for a client with unstable angina who weights 60 kg. After administering the loading dose, the nurse initiates the infusion at 12nits/kg/hour per protocol.T he nurse should program the infusion pump to deliver how many ml/hour enter numeric value only if rounding is required round to the whole number 14mL/hr?

Help I'm lost here with this math question.??

Newbie_RN17

Newbie_RN17

Specializes in Med-Surg, Emergency. Has 2 years experience. 121 Posts

:crying2:

The healthcare provider prescribes an IV solution of Heparin Sodium 25,000 Units in 5% Dextrose injection 500ml for a client with unstable angina who weights 60 kg. After administering the loading dose, the nurse initiates the infusion at 12nits/kg/hour per protocol.T he nurse should program the infusion pump to deliver how many ml/hour enter numeric value only if rounding is required round to the whole number 14mL/hr?

Help I'm lost here with this math question.??

Are you wondering if you have come to the correct answer or how to get it? To get the correct answer this is my method:

First thing you have to do is figure out how many units you are giving the patient. So multiply the 60 kg by the 12 units/kg. That will be your units per hour. Then, you have 25,000 units in 500ml, so I always do a proportion:

25000 units = (insert the number of units you get here)

500 ml x ml

Cross multiply the 500 by the number of units you get in your 12units*60kg and then divide that by 25,000 to get your ml/hr answer.

edit: i don't know why it won't stay formatted but the x ml should be under the number of units in that proportion :\

nurseprnRN

nurseprnRN, BSN, RN

2 Articles; 5,114 Posts

NewbieRN has helpfully given you her way to calculate.

Generally, though, we don't do your homework or answer your questions for you until we see what you have done, so we can see where your thinking needs a little guidance. Just giving you the answer doesn't really teach you how to think about this problem, and that's a critical skill you'll need.

So, let's break it down. Do you know what the different parts of the word problem mean? If somebody weighs 60kg and is prescribed 12 units per kg, how many units is that? That's simple multiplication, right? Write that down. Let's call that "A" units. He's going to get that in an hour, right? "A" units per hour.

Next, you need to look at the desired dose and what you have on hand to give it with. In this case, you have 25,000 units in 500cc. How many units are there in one cc, then? You can do the division. Write that down; let's call that "X" units per cc.

Now think. You have "X" units in one cc, and you need to give "A" units, how many cc is that? That's the number of cc per hour you need to give "A" units.

You might find it helpful to sketch these out on a piece of paper, rather than stressing over finding THE formula or equation. The point you need to get isn't what equation to use -- that's just a tool. What you need to understand is what they question wants you to figure out. How you figure it out comes next.

RN_TOBE

RN_TOBE

34 Posts

Are you wondering if you have come to the correct answer or how to get it? To get the correct answer this is my method:

First thing you have to do is figure out how many units you are giving the patient. So multiply the 60 kg by the 12 units/kg. That will be your units per hour. Then, you have 25,000 units in 500ml, so I always do a proportion:

25000 units = (insert the number of units you get here)

500 ml x ml

Cross multiply the 500 by the number of units you get in your 12units*60kg and then divide that by 25,000 to get your ml/hr answer.

edit: i don't know why it won't stay formatted but the x ml should be under the number of units in that proportion :\

thanks....