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HBsAb ranges

TJayqt TJayqt (New) New

Hey guys, I'm trying to understand more about Hep B serologies. for HBsAb, in general, does it mean that the higher the number (above 10 mIU/ml), the greater the immunity? for example, does a number in 30,000 mIU/ml range have stronger immunity than a number in the 100's mIU/ml? and how high can these numbers actually get?

any feedback appreciated.

Thanks!

Edited by TJayqt

An anti-HBs serologic test result of ≥ 10mIU/mL indicates immunity. No further routine doses or testing are indicated.

An inadequate response to vaccination = Serum anti-HBs

A positive result indicates recovery from acute or chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection or acquired immunity from HBV vaccination. This assay does not differentiate between a vaccine-induced immune response and an immune response induced by infection with HBV. A positive total antihepatitis B core (anti-HBc) result would indicate that the hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) response is due to past HBV infection.

Per assay manufacturer's instructions for use, positive results, defined as anti-HBs levels of 12.0 mIU/mL or greater, indicate adequate immunity to hepatitis B from past hepatitis B or HBV vaccination. However, per current CDC guidance,(1) individuals with anti-HBs levels of 10 mIU/mL or greater after completing an HBV vaccination series are considered protected from hepatitis B.

Negative results, defined as anti-HBs levels of

Indeterminate results, defined as anti-HBs levels in the range from 5 to 11.9 mIU/mL, indicate inability to determine if anti-HBs is present at levels consistent with recovery or immunity. Repeat testing is recommended in 1 to 3 months.

Hope this helps!

Sources for More Info:

HBAB - Clinical: Hepatitis B Surface Antibody, Qualitative/Quantitative, Serum (some of the information above is from here)

http://www.who.int/occupational_health/activities/3hepatiti.pdf

http://www.hepb.org/assets/Uploads/understanding-blood-tests.pdf

HBV FAQs for Health Professionals | Division of Viral Hepatitis | CDC

https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hbv/pdfs/SerologicChartv8.pdf

http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2109.pdf

Hepatitis B Test: Reference Range, Interpretation, Collection and Panels

Hi KrCmommy522, thanks so much for your response. I understand that anything above 10 mIU/ml indicates immunity, but I'm just trying to understand the huge varying ranges already within the bounds of immunity. I am wondering if the higher numbers (~10,000 - 50,000+ mIU/ml), perhaps, have a longer immunity, versus the lower numbers (~50 mIU/ml - 500 mIU/ml).

any thoughts?

I think I may be getting my units messed up. Everything I'm reading seems to be using different measuring units: U/L vs. IU/L vs. mIU/ml.... ugh. is 10 U/L = 1000 mIU/ml?

Hi KrCmommy522, thanks so much for your response. I understand that anything above 10 mIU/ml indicates immunity, but I'm just trying to understand the huge varying ranges already within the bounds of immunity. I am wondering if the higher numbers (~10,000 - 50,000+ mIU/ml), perhaps, have a longer immunity, versus the lower numbers (~50 mIU/ml - 500 mIU/ml).

any thoughts?

I don't think you should focus so much on the varying ranges. Just that as long as it is ≥ 10 IU/mL. Of course, the larger the level, the greater the immunity. But, they only look to ensure that it is ≥ 10.

If your titer is greater than 10 mIU/mL, then you have adequate immunity which is thought to confer lifetime immunity, but studies so far show 30 years. This is because these studies are on-going.

Read these:

The 3-Shot Hepatitis B Vaccine - Do I Need to Restart the Series if I Am Off the Recommended Schedule? - Hepatitis B Foundation

CDC Guidance for Evaluating Health-Care Personnel for Hepatitis B Virus Protection and for Administering Postexposure Management

Hepatitis B and the Need for a Booster Dose | Clinical Infectious Diseases | Oxford Academic

I think I may be getting my units messed up. Everything I'm reading seems to be using different measuring units: U/L vs. IU/L vs. mIU/ml.... ugh. is 10 U/L = 1000 mIU/ml?

An international unit is an amount of a substance agreed upon by scientists and doctors. A milli-international unit is one-thousandth of an international unit.

As far as I know, they kind of equal out as in:

1 mIU/mL = 1 IU/L

1 IU = 1000 mIU

1 L = 1000 mL

I could be wrong on that though.

This says it converts to the same thing, but not sure if its accurate: IU/L to mIU/mL Converter, Chart -- EndMemo

FAQ - How do I convert International Units (IU) to milligrams?

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