Has Anyone Been Fired After They Gave Two Weeks Notice?

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This is a hypothetical question, as it hasn't happened to me, but has anyone been fired after they gave written resignation and notice to their employer? If so, did it count against you as far as your eligibility for rehire? Does your old employer consider that you left voluntarily in good standing, or that you left before fulfilling your notice? This situation is bound to have happened to someone somewhere before. How horrible would it be if you gave your employer a 30 day notice to be nice and professional, and on your last day they fired you just to be jerks? Or they told you not to come back your last week and then tell HR that you left without giving notice? As horrible as it sounds, I'm sure this practice happens in places. I worked with a nurse who gave two weeks notice at the hospital and the manager told him he didn't have to work his last 3 days. Whether or not they counted it against his eligibility for rehire, I don't know, I never had contact with him after he left. I know when I quit and gave my two weeks notice they kept me on the schedule for the full two weeks.

turningred15

54 Posts

I quit Monday and gave the required 4 weeks. Management told HR that they didn't want me to stay the 4 weeks. So Monday was my last day. HR said I will be be paid out the four weeks like I worked it and it will say resigned when future employers contact them. So I got a pretty good deal.

Brewer,RN

20 Posts

I quit Monday and gave the required 4 weeks. Management told HR that they didn't want me to stay the 4 weeks. So Monday was my last day. HR said I will be be paid out the four weeks like I worked it and it will say resigned when future employers contact them. So I got a pretty good deal.

Wow that is a good deal, almost unheard of. Are you in an at-will state or a union state? Are you a staff nurse, or in a hard position to fill? 4 weeks required notice seems a little high, but I guess it depends on where you work. Everyplace I've ever worked requires 2 weeks for staff, and 4 weeks for upper management. I do tend to give a month's notice for jobs I like, and only 2 weeks for jobs I can't stand.

allnurses Guide

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

2 Articles; 6,838 Posts

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 12 years experience.

Actually it is not at all uncommon for an employer to not require someone to work out their notice. It is not the same as being fired and it isn't necessarily a reflection of the employer disliking the individual. Usually it is a monetary decision or a political one meant to keep other employees from being lured away by tales of greener pastures. It also can signify a replacement was already found. It is still considered a resignation, not a termination, both for purposes of references and unemployment benefits.