Update

  1. Hi all!

    Just thought I would update everyone on my plans since I love hearing what ya'll are doing. Everyone here has been such a help!

    I talked to the ROTC nursing officer for the school I am transferring to next semester. I had researched everything before I met with him & so nothing was all that new to me. I brought two friends to the meeting who are very liberal and wary of military just to make sure I asked the questions I needed to and make sure I wasn't getting bs from the recruiter. He was very helpful and didn't push me to make any agreements or what not.

    The only thing that I was wondering about was that I brought up the fact I have/am diagonised with asthma but I haven't used an inhaler in years. My mother and I both agree it was childhood asthma but I have had inhalers perscribed since the age of 13, just in case. I know you need a wavier for that but the officer that I met with mentioned the fact they can't go and open up my medical records. He said I can't lie on the form, but I haven't been using an inhaler and have been fine for years, there was no reason to mention it. That it will automatically make "me guilty before being innocent." That was my only red flag throughout the meeting.

    I really think ROTC might be the right path for me. Training me to be an officer and get used to the army life & pay for my school. Not being in debt, either to myself or my parents, is exciting.

    Even though people keep telling me I am crazy to join the army, not now while there is a war, go air force, etc etc. I know that joining the army would be a great great thing for me & since I've been toying around with the idea since Nov., I am more determined to be a member of the Nurse Corps.

    Now I just gotta get started on PT. No army is going to want me in the shape I am in now!
    Last edit by raskolnikov on May 6, '07 : Reason: my post was sloppy before.
  2. Visit raskolnikov profile page

    About raskolnikov

    Joined: Nov '06; Posts: 25
    Student

    5 Comments

  3. by   Gennaver
    Quote from raskolnikov
    ...the officer that I met with mentioned the fact they can't go and open up my medical records. He said I can't lie on the form, but I haven't been using an inhaler and have been fine for years, there was no reason to mention it. That it will automatically make "me guilty before being innocent." That was my only red flag throughout the meeting.

    I..!

    [FONT="Arial Black"]stop talking with that officer!!!

    Firstly, to lie by deception is a lie and even though you likely could earn a waiver and be accepted as you are...if you lie and are later caught not only is there the risk of a dishonorable discharge but, you have concerns to deal with.

    Any officer who tells you to lie or that you will be guilty before being innocent needs to be told, "put it in writing" before you agree to lie. As great and hardworking as my recruiter was, I did not lie by deception for my two potential medical concerns. Neither one even required a waiver...all I had to do was list it on the meps form and then answer the meps physician about it. He deemed that they were not "waiver-requiring issues".

    Childhood asthma does not require a waiver...if you do not have a diagnosis as currently having asthma then I doubt you'd even need a waiver for it.
    Be honest.

    You had childhood asthma. This is not a dq, oh and that tidbit about your medical history tha tthe officer said is a secret, is not a secret.

    Gen
  4. by   raskolnikov
    That is why that information he gave me raised a red flag. I was talking to my mother and we were thinking I should go to my doctor, see what she has to say about my asthma.

    I would take the lung capacity test or whatever it is called, but I have heard people say on the internet either a) do it, it will make the process easier b) don't do it until asked, as it raises red flags.

    I definitely don't want to lie on paper but don't want to get DQ either.
  5. by   Gennaver
    Quote from raskolnikov
    That is why that information he gave me raised a red flag. I was talking to my mother and we were thinking I should go to my doctor, see what she has to say about my asthma.

    I would take the lung capacity test or whatever it is called, but I have heard people say on the internet either a) do it, it will make the process easier b) don't do it until asked, as it raises red flags.

    I definitely don't want to lie on paper but don't want to get DQ either.
    My suggestion is to get documentation from your doctor what your "diagnosis" was, especially if it was only Childhood asthma and was resolved by the age of 13.

    I was told that one of my things would be a major hassle and it was not even an issue. The Meps physician merely asked me a question about it and after I answered he wrote it on my physical with his initials authorizing his consent behind it. I think if you bring a COPY, of your own doctor's releasing form with your diagnosis listed and you can show it to the Meps physician when you meet with him/her and s/he asks you about your childhood asthma, you can say that you brought a copy of your diagnosis/release with contact information from your doc. Hopefully that will satisfy. Oh, sure, you "could" give it to your recruiter first but, I say, keep a copy for yourself so that you can show the Meps doc for certain.

    Gen
    p.s. besides, it is a bureaucratic process anyhow and can takes months as it is, we are going in as officers, not enlisted, the recruiters who are used to enlisted might think our packets take forever anyhow, so what, they do sometimes! mine took months and months, what is a couple more moments? right?
    Last edit by Gennaver on May 9, '07 : Reason: to add
  6. by   raskolnikov
    Gen, thanks for your help!

    So my plan is: I am going to stop by my pediatrician (ha. I love how I am planning to be an officer in the Army yet still go to a pediatrician) after graduation and she what she has to say, get any and all documentation, hopefully, before all the paperwork.

    - Cate

    PS - I've started working out again. Running/walking two miles. It's a slow start but I'll get there eventually. But man, do my quads kill! I'm stretching but no pain no gain.
  7. by   Gennaver
    Quote from raskolnikov
    Gen, thanks for your help!

    So my plan is: I am going to stop by my pediatrician (ha. I love how I am planning to be an officer in the Army yet still go to a pediatrician) after graduation and she what she has to say, get any and all documentation, hopefully, before all the paperwork.

    - Cate

    PS - I've started working out again. Running/walking two miles. It's a slow start but I'll get there eventually. But man, do my quads kill! I'm stretching but no pain no gain.

    Congratulations and best wishes in your endeavors!!

    To have such a strong plan of action at 18 years old is impressive indeed.

    Gen

close