Gliclazide help!

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Question from Canadian student... repost from Nursing Students forum: I need some info on gliclazide (sold as diamicron in canada). Can't find it in prentice hall 2009 + davis 2008 (i think) drug guides... likely due to the fact that this drug is not available in the US (and I think I have 2 american publications) I know the drug is a 2nd gen. sulfonylurea antidiabetic agent. I need some information on important nursing interventions to include in a nursing process outline for administering this med.

Here is the original thread w/discussion so far: https://allnurses.com/nursing-student-assistance/gliclazide-listed-your-407449.html#post3741454

I have a NIDDM pt. (w/ chronic renal failure, HTN, CHF) taking 80mg PO bid... according to drugs.com this usual dose is 80mg QD or 160-320mg in two divided doses with meals for tx of type II diabetes

Will the nursing considerations for this medications differ greatly from other meds in its class? My guess is 'not', but I'd rather not be guessing here. Please help! Thanks in advance

Pediatric Critical Care Columnist

NotReady4PrimeTime, RN

5 Articles; 7,358 Posts

Specializes in NICU, PICU, PCVICU and peds oncology.

If you can wait for your answer until later tonight, I'll look it up on e-CPS when I get to work and post what I find when I go on my break.

calypte

18 Posts

that would be amazing! Thank you so much :)

Pediatric Critical Care Columnist

NotReady4PrimeTime, RN

5 Articles; 7,358 Posts

Specializes in NICU, PICU, PCVICU and peds oncology.

The information in the CPS isn't too nursing-specific... The highlights:

- plasma peak = 4-6 hrs

- 94% protein bound

- T 1/2 = ~10.4 hrs

- renal excretion

- efficacy may decrease over time

- only indicated for mild Type IIs with appropriate dietary controls

- may need insulin for intercurrent acute illness/stress/trauma/surgery

- major adverse effects are hepatic dysfunction, hematologic dysfunction, disulfiram reactions (although less frequent than for othe sulfonylureas), photosensitivity

- requires close glucose monitoring

- most endocrinologists recommend annual or semi-annual drug holidays to assess how much the drug is contributing to glucose control

Hope this helps.

calypte

18 Posts

That definitely helps, thank you SO much!

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