voluntary overtime

  1. Our unit, like every other, is understaffed...leaving many of the nurses working voluntary overtime. I am one of a few nurses, though, that does not like to work overtime. I like spending that time at home with my husband and my family. Since I work nights, working an extra shift involves 2 days, not just one because I have to sleep. It seems though, that some of the night nurses that I work with are ticked because a few of us won't volunteer for overtime. I say that it's not my fault that we aren't staffed appropriately. I do feel bad when they report having a lousy night, but I enjoy my family time. How do you all feel about this? Do any of your coworkers give you a hard time about not doing voluntary overtime?
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    About sunneeRN

    Joined: Jan '07; Posts: 28; Likes: 29

    6 Comments

  3. by   SCRN1
    I wouldn't feel bad about not volunteering to work overtime. They can do it if they choose to...that's THEIR decision. You're not making them do it.
  4. by   llg
    I agree with SCRN1. The word "voluntary" means that you can choose to do it or not do it. Make your choice and let them make their choices. If they give you a hard time about it, tell them that you have other important things in your life as well as work and choose not to work overtime. Remind them politely that they are free to make their own personal choices as well.

    As I have said many times on this site, as long as nurses agree to work overtime, the administration has little incentive for solving the underlying staffing issues. While I think everyone should pitch in and help a little during a temporary crisis, if the understaffing is a long-term problem, then continuing to cover shifts more than you would like to is only enabling the administration to continue to avoid solving the underlying problem.
  5. by   ponytailman
    The key word is voluntary, not mandatory, and if the extra money is not worth the sacrifice at home then the answer should be self apparent.
  6. by   mvanz9999
    I agree with all the above posters. It's not your fault they chose to do it. You also can't be held responsible for their frustration. If they don't have it in them to say no, not your problem.
  7. by   stillpressingon
    Quote from SCRN1
    I wouldn't feel bad about not volunteering to work overtime. They can do it if they choose to...that's THEIR decision. You're not making them do it.
    :yeahthat: It is COMPLETELY their decision to work overtime. Enjoy your family time.
  8. by   Otessa
    You were hired for a certain amount of hours/week or pay period.

    Voluntary is just that-VOLUNTARY. Tell them you love your job and your co-workers. If they ALL would stop working overtime then they might HAVE hire the correct amount of nurses to work those hours.

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