Foley Induction?

Posted
by platinum_garb platinum_garb Member Nurse

Specializes in corrections, MH, geriatrics. Has 10 years experience.

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platinum_garb

platinum_garb

Specializes in corrections, MH, geriatrics. Has 10 years experience. 88 Posts

I personally had this done with my first kid. The hospital I was at did use a bag of saline for weight on the end. I can't remember how long it took until the bulb fell out, but in my case, I did not need any pitocin once the bulb fell out- I progressed on my own. I was 0-1cm when I came in, and it was about 19 hrs from the time they started until I delivered. I was 39 weeks at the time and being induced for medical reasons.

I definitely hope my experience will be similar to yours. Thank you for sharing it with me...makes me feel better!

platinum_garb

platinum_garb

Specializes in corrections, MH, geriatrics. Has 10 years experience. 88 Posts

We cannot give medical advice/predictions. You will need to ask your OB/GYN as to the usual protocol.[/

Fortunately, other nurses did, and for that I am grateful.

Edited by platinum_garb
first draft was not very nice

Munchlet24

Munchlet24

1 Post

Hi-

I had this done with my first at 41 + 5.

My midwife did it in her office, and sent me home with it taped to my leg. It fell out in a few hours, (I walked a lot, gravity and all) and I was about 3-4 cm dilated at that point.

Hopefully you'll progress naturally at that point. Good luck!

It feels a little weird, but I'd do it again!

ischialspines

ischialspines

Specializes in L&D. 42 Posts

I was just looking this up the other day! I haven't seen this used on my L&D unit and was wondering why not (plenty of pit inductions on unripe cervices, but at least they have to wait til 39 wks now, but that's another story). I also can't find a basic 'how-to' (not for me to do it obviously, but just to see how it works) or any negative side effects (in theory, seems like r/f infection for sure or possible cervical tearing could be increased).

Excuse my ignorance, but the foley tubing is inserted through the cervix (which then must be dilated at least terussome?)the u and into , the bulb is inflated more than we would if it was being used to cath a bladder, and the pressure causes dilation from the top. Memranes don't have to be ruptured. Right? Seems like a good way to get a cervix to ripen at least, IMO, but would want to monitor temps, etc.

More info, please! I am curious.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 16 years experience. 14,297 Posts

Ischial - yes, you have it correct. However, it doesn't ripen the cervix, it manually dilates it (are you familiar with laminaria? Same concept). Basically, it forces the cervix open. Generally, it's filled with 30-40ml of saline, and rule of thumb is every 10 ml of saline that's inflated into the bulb equals one cm.

ischialspines

ischialspines

Specializes in L&D. 42 Posts

I was talking about it today with other nurses and the general response is that it can be pretty hurty (not to scare the OP!). Not sure the hurt factor vs. pitting to start labor. And I suppose it can be manually dilated without getting ripe, therefore still not necessarily making labor happen. thanks!!

StudyingNursing

StudyingNursing

22 Posts

Cook Medical equipment makes a balloon catheter for induction: http://www.cookmedical.com/wh/datasheetFeature.do?id=4486

You can read their literature for more information on how the foley bulp induction process, and it has illustrations. The cheaper way to do this is using a 30 cc foley catheter, which is more common. Sometimes I've seen this used with pitocin, or before pitocin. It does work.