Non-BSN to MSN advice?

  1. hello all!

    this is my first post, so please bear with me

    i just recently graduated with a ba in anthropology. when i initially started college i was a pre-nursing major.. during the first two and a half years i finished all the prereq's required for entry into the bsn program (at sdsu). i won't go into the reasons for why i switched, but now since i'm done with undergrad i'm planning on going back into nursing.


    i have a few questions:
    for a person like me (i already have the prereq's down, about 30 hours of volunteer time and with a 3.3gpa), and :hoping: that i'll be qualified (enough) so i could start applying for programs next year (fall 2010), are there any accelerated/direct msn programs you would recommend? i'm checking out programs in ca, or, wa, nm, az, co, and hi...

    would those who have gone through this or currently going through this consider me "qualified enough?" (petty, i know, but i don't know who else i'd be going up against).


    in general, is there any advice or suggestions you could give me on making this transition? any possible ways to get more patient care experience?


    i'll take any response! thanks for your time, hope this isn't too confusing...
  2. Visit natty553 profile page

    About natty553

    Joined: May '09; Posts: 2
    from US

    14 Comments

  3. by   ambermichelle
    I certainly am no authority, but I have looked around a little myself for MSN programs, since I already have 2 Bachelors degrees. Most of the ones I found want a BSN. Those that don't, at least want you to be an RN first. You could get your RN without taking the extra stuff for the BSN, then apply for the MSN programs. I didn't research online MSN's, just "brick and mortar."
  4. by   leighton
    I believe you at least have to be an RN first before you can apply. Most programs are either RN with a Bachelor's in another field(RN to MSN) or BSN to MSN.
  5. by   juliewoo
    Sounds like you'd be a good fit for a Direct Entry Master's program (for students with a bachelor's in a field other than nursing). Here's a website that lists a handful of programs throughout the US: http://www.allnursingschools.com/fea...celerated-msn/. Some of these programs grant both a BSN and an MSN degree. Others will prepare you to sit for the NCLEX-RN first and then move on to the advanced practice curriculum with only an MSN at the end.

    I wouldn't call it a complete list because they completely left out Massachusetts which has at least 5 schools with a Direct Entry MSN program. I'll be entering the MGH program in the fall.

    Good luck!
  6. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from natty553
    would those who have gone through this or currently going through this consider me "qualified enough?" (petty, i know, but i don't know who else i'd be going up against).
    i'm in a demsn program and, honestly, i'm not sure that you'd be very competitive for admission to our program. while i don't know the details of everybody's grades and experience, it's a pretty accomplished group of folks and the ones i've talked to about it have gpas upwards of 3.8, several are bilingual, a couple are published, three have another masters degree, one has a professional license, and most have significant professional work experience.

    as a newly minted ba with a 3.3 gpa, i don't think you'd get into our program unless you've got some really compelling skills or experience to go along with that.

    let me be clear, though. i'm not saying that you're unqualified because if you've got the brains, study skills, and tenacity to earn a ba then you've got more than enough firepower to get through nursing school. i am, however, saying that you're not very competitive based on the teeny bit of information that you've provided.
  7. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from juliewoo
    Sounds like you'd be a good fit for a Direct Entry Master's program (for students with a bachelor's in a field other than nursing). Here's a website that lists a handful of programs throughout the US: http://www.allnursingschools.com/fea...celerated-msn/. Some of these programs grant both a BSN and an MSN degree. Others will prepare you to sit for the NCLEX-RN first and then move on to the advanced practice curriculum with only an MSN at the end.

    I wouldn't call it a complete list because they completely left out Massachusetts which has at least 5 schools with a Direct Entry MSN program. I'll be entering the MGH program in the fall.

    Good luck!
    Check out the following link for accelerated programs (DEMSN and 2nd BS) around the country; it's from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and is as comprehensive a list as you'll find: http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Media/FactS...eratedProg.htm
  8. by   natty553
    hey thanks a lot, i really appreciate all of your feedback.

    i guess my next question would be what can i do to get up to that level? such as programs, activities, etc... i'm planning on going back into volunteering, and also possibly doing phlebotomy or emt-b training, whichever would be more of a help getting in. have any recommendations? my dream would be doing work in areas outside of the "complete" hospital setting, expeditions/adventures, msf-type work, things of that nature...

    out of curiosity, ♪♫ in my ♥, what demsn program are you in?
  9. by   2011MSN
    If you live in San Diego, look at USD MEPN program, sign up for one of their information seminars. This program is for people just like you (and me), non-medical degrees who want to become a nurse. I start in August, I had a 3.3 undergraduate GPA, so I was right there with you.

    It is expensive, but worth the cost to me to finish and get my MSN in 2 years...versus the cost of something like ADN to BSN to MSN...and the school overall is excellent. Also with many other programs in San Diego, there are long waiting periods, versus this program. Plus you probably have all your pre-reqs done as is.

    If you have any questions, let me know

    Thanks!
  10. by   clam27
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    Check out the following link for accelerated programs (DEMSN and 2nd BS) around the country; it's from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and is as comprehensive a list as you'll find: http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Media/FactS...eratedProg.htm


    thank you so much for the list! i've been looking for something just like that!
  11. by   JRN72
    Thanks for the links!
  12. by   kwong30
    I was in your position 3 years back and i didn't think I was "qualified enough" and the reality is, you won't really know until you've applied to find out. Also, application pool varies and every school looks at the applicant on an individual basis. I say this because my undergrad GPA was LOW. Sure, it met minimal qualifications, but I wasn't the most qualified (nor did I publish works or done anything "impressive"), but I was qualified enough since I got into all the applied accelerated MSN progs. I also believe schools tend to look at your prerequisite and relevant nursing grades than GPA alone. Maybe seeing improvement when they noticed your grades trended upward as you reach senior year.

    Other than the extracurriculars you have, my suggestion is reflection of why you decided to pursue nursing afterall. An excellent, well-written, stand-out personal statement of who you are and your motivations to become a nurse can set you apart from the rest. My graduate adviser (I think she does admissions too) stated that she doesn't care so much for grades alone. So that tells me when students have met minimal GPA qualifications, they move on to the next category (healthcare experience, cultural sensivity/experience, personal statement, reference, CV/resume, etc)- don't take these aspects lightly because they matter!

    Good luck
  13. by   kebunt
    I've been researching accelerated-BSN and Direct-Entry MSN programs myself. I was leaning towards the MSN programs, but I've spoken with some admissions people, and think BSN may be the way for me to go. For instance...

    I spoke with a school last week that said admissions to their MSN is particularly difficult because you have to provide significant experience relevant to the specialty area you select for the MSN (she suggested several years), as you have to defend your position in an interview with a grad school faculty member and demonstrate your commitment to that particular specialty. On the other hand, they don't expect much if any experience for the accelerated BSN program. She tells me that most applicants choose to do the 12 month BSN, and then upon completion, if they work for one of the university's hospitals, they can continue the MSN program for free.

    I don't know if that's helpful to you, but that's the advice I've been given having only about 6 months of volunteer experience myself. Every school is different, and every applicant pool as well, so I'd suggest aranging some pre-application advising appointments to see what would work best for you.

    There are some really great options out there, so good luck with whatever you decide!
  14. by   BusyMomRN
    Follow the links to the schools that were listed in an earlier post. Each school will have different qualifications and some will be more competetive than others.
    I have a BS in Dental Hygiene and a 3.6 GPA, which isnt the best but not too shabby, and was accepted into a MSN direct-entry program in GA.
    Narrow down the schools and apply, apply, apply! Good Luck!

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