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Do hospitals hire LPN's?

LPN/LVN   (5,282 Views | 3 Replies)
by New_LPN New_LPN (New) New

1,148 Profile Views; 14 Posts

Hello-

I'm trying to get a job at UPMC in Pittsburgh, PA and I would really like to work in the hospital, preferably Med/Surg. I am a new LPN, so I know this is a high reaching goal, but am I wasting my time trying?

I've seen (a few) job postings on their site for LTC and Home Health positions, but never for in hospital LPN's. I really don't feel confident enough yet to do Home Health, and I would prefer to not do LTC...(I worked as CNA in LTC)

I really think that for me Med/Surg would be the best place to learn as much as possible, as I do plan to continue on to RN. Anyone know if they do hire LPN's in the hospitals? Anyone have suggestions for other ideas for LPN's who really want to learn?

I am new to Pittsburgh and really struggling to find work! I'm open to suggestions!!!

Thanks!

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TheCommuter has 14 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

4 Followers; 226 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 320,819 Profile Views

Your best shot would be to apply at a more outlying or rural hospital and see what happens. Most major cities have more than enough RNs to fill hospital slots, whereas the smaller cities and more underserved areas might be more willing to hire an LPN onto one of their hospital units.

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106 Posts; 6,755 Profile Views

I know Ohio Valley Hospital and West Penn are hiring experienced LPNs. LTC affiliated to UPMC is also hiring LPNs. Good luck

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HazelLPN has 54 years experience as a LPN and specializes in Adult ICU/PICU/NICU.

489 Posts; 18,058 Profile Views

I am a retired LPN who spent my entire career in the hospital setting.

At the time of my retirement (2009), the unit were I worked no longer posted LPN positions them to hire LPNs,yet if someone had some sort of "in" they could be hired as an LPN into an RN position. Both the state and hospital were I practiced allowed a very board scope of LPNs and there was little difference clinically between was an LPN could do and an RN could do.

What will give you an "in" is if you are actively working on your RN...be it in nursing school or taking your prereqs. I would suggest that you might want to do some volunteer work in the hospital during day shift and get to know people. Get to know the nurse manager and nurses on the unit. Do an excellent job and be helpful. People will get to know you and know they can rely on you. Of course, you won't be practing as a volunteer LPN, you will be making up charts, helping the unit clerk, passing trays, visting with patients, stocking the unit, help with transports and once you earn the trust of the staff you may get to do much more. When you make good human connections, the rules change.

For example, when I worked in the PICU, they had stopped hiring LPNs and retiring LPNs were replaced with an RN. Our unit clerk on the weekends was in LPN school. She did an exceptional job as a clerk...and it really makes a difference when you have a good strong person in that chair....because they pretty much run the unit with the charge nurse. When she graduated, the nurse manager hired her right out of school as a new graduate LPN because she knew she was intelligent, motivated and already knew the unit and the people. She is now only a handful of LPNs who remain in that unit and the only LPN who is not a veteran nurse.

The best way for you to work in the hospital is to go and get your RN. The second best way is to make thoes connections and set yourself apart from the rest because there are always exceptional people who are exceptions to the rule.

Best to you,

Mrs H.

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