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direct entry nursing

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I am currently applying to direct entry schools, I graduated in 3.5 years with 140 credit hours, and a few graduate courses, in Dec 2008 with a general health science degree from Purdue. I interned in management for Walgreens corporation during school and worked for two years as an assistant manager of a sears mall store. I paid off my student loans.

Then I decided that before I go to school I would serve the military, and my country - like I always wanted to do - and am now in the US navy. I received a 3.5 writing gre. 155 quant, and 152 verbal a week ago. My applications are due by November, but I assume many are rolling admissions. Due to being out of school since Dec 2008 I will beef up my application with a non-required Excelsior exam in anatomy and physiology, and 20-50 us navy 3-5 hour certificate courses on the subject matter, to add to my prior 2 years of consecutive coursework in A and P. I am writing essays, requesting recommendations from the past and present, and studying like a motivated applicant is expected to study in my opinion. Most of my community service was completed during my time for sears. I also plan on attending a few info sessions to introduce myself to the faculty, while managing a busy us navy "ship-yard workload."

I am sure many of you have years of experience and some are currently applying to the same schools as me: lol. If you have any advice or assistance on how to better my application please advise.

Dustin

Firstly, thank you for service in our Navy! The skills and discipline you've acquired in the navy will be invaluable. You have good scores, although if you have an opportunity to bump us that GRE writing score then you should. But your other two scores are good, for the most part the scores are just a formality, as long as you take it and performed reasonably you'll be okay. I'd narrow down which schools you're interested in, say like at most six and start preparing and it's a great idea to meet, call, or email with questions. Especially now in the summer when they are less busy. Some schools are rolling admission some are not but you call and ask and they will tell you! Start preparing letters of recommendation, they are key, commanders and or direct supervisors in the navy that are familiar with you and you character would be an excellent start. Those can take a while to get organized so do that, update your resume to highlight areas that demonstrate your an aptitude for higher learning, or really anything you think important and any special recognition you may have received. Don't underestimate any of your skills or experiences. Also since it's grad school don't be afraid to write a two page resume. They don't care. Hope this helps a bit!

Yes, the statements about reference letters is important because I will request them to include aspects of character. I was simply going to inform them to list accomplishments. Yes, I feel that the writing score could be improved. I received an A in one year of English, and one semester of business writing at Purdue so I hope this will discount the writing score a tad. I am focusing on taking non-mandated courses as I mentioned and a standardized exam to show my knowledge.

Thanks!

Some people frown upon calling the school. I was reading one person who UPS with signature their material so they would not have to call: this gives me some confusion on whether the school enjoys applicants calling for these questions. Opinions?

I spoke to Vandy, Johns Hopkins, Columbia and Yale over the phone and visited two schools. Some schools like it some don't I guess but everyone I spoke to was very helpful! I'd just do your research beforehand so you have intelligent questions to ask. Overall I think you will be an excellent applicant and have a good chance of being accepted into more than one program. As I'm certain they say constantly in the military "attention to detail" attention to detail is key in the application, check re check then check it again, but if you're starting now you're gonna be in great shape.