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Different between ineffective airway clearance and ineffective breathing pattern

Students   (155 Views | 3 Replies)

259 Profile Views; 19 Posts

May anyone further explains what is the difference between ineffective airway clearance and ineffective breathing pattern?

Once I ask my teachers the same question for a care plan related to pneumonia, and she said both should be OK.

 

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WanderingWilder is a ASN and specializes in Med-Surg.

385 Posts; 4,182 Profile Views

ineffective breathing pattern would be related to the breathing pattern is it too fast, too slow, shallow, accessory muscles being used, purse lip breathing? ineffective airway clearance would be a nonproductive congestive cough or inability to clear sputum. Both of these could happen with pna.

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Okey Foley is a RN and specializes in Surgical Floor.

8 Posts; 205 Profile Views

I really struggled with this in school. 

Airway - the physical airway. Think obstruction of a straw. All the way from the mouth to the bronchioles. In pneumonia, mucous and fluid could block that "straw" of the airway.

Breathing - act of lung expansion, inspiration and expiration. As Wandering said, examples with pneumonia are too shallow d/t pain or congestion, tachypnea in attempt to compensate for not getting enough oxygen.

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Rosalie Blythe has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in General Surgery, Endoscopy/Gastroenterology, PACU.

55 Posts; 821 Profile Views

On 3/17/2020 at 3:27 PM, Okey Foley said:

I really struggled with this in school. 

Airway - the physical airway. Think obstruction of a straw. All the way from the mouth to the bronchioles. In pneumonia, mucous and fluid could block that "straw" of the airway.

Breathing - act of lung expansion, inspiration and expiration. As Wandering said, examples with pneumonia are too shallow d/t pain or congestion, tachypnea in attempt to compensate for not getting enough oxygen.

You can observe that too with patients who are fresh post-op day 1 from abdominal surgery; they are less likely to take a deep breathe because of post-op pain. Thats why pain management is important for any post-op patient (your other post 🙂 )

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