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Caring in the ED

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kmitch99 kmitch99 (New) New

I am writing a paper in my BSN program about the constraints and supports to promoting caring relationships between ED RN and patients in the ED. I would love to hear your opinions on the subject. What do you feel are the issues that you face every day that either promote or hinder your ability to have caring interactions? Are caring relationships important in the fast paced ED? Is it even possible to provide them? Is it important to you? Let me know your opinion! Thanks

veetach

Specializes in Emergency Room/corrections. Has 16 years experience.

I am writing a paper in my BSN program about the constraints and supports to promoting caring relationships between ED RN and patients in the ED. I would love to hear your opinions on the subject. What do you feel are the issues that you face every day that either promote or hinder your ability to have caring interactions? Are caring relationships important in the fast paced ED? Is it even possible to provide them? Is it important to you? Let me know your opinion! Thanks

First, I would like to say that it IS important to me, I try to be a caring and compassionate nurse. Unfortunately, I dont feel that I am able to do this as well as I would like. I have 7-8 patients who are all demanding of my time, I may be prepping one for the OR, while another is getting ready to go to the Cath Lab, and EMS rolls in with an unresponsive overdose. I work in a busy ED, we NEVER have a slow night, and the nurses are all busy all of the time. Whats the answer? Someone please let me know. :o

Brotherbob, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER.

Are caring relationships important in the fast paced ED? Is it even possible to provide them? Is it important to you? Let me know your opinion! Thanks
I believe it is very important to build a caring relation to the patient in ED. Very important for the patient because fear and anxiety puts even more stress to the body. It is also important for my job satisfaction . On the floor I had hours or even days to build a relationship. In ED I have a few seconds or minutes to show the patient he/she can trust me. It is such a challenge. Tone of voice, eyes and body language are more important than words.

Sometimes it is not possible, the pat is too scared, too mad too drunk or too nasty. I try my best, do my work and move on.

needsmore$

Specializes in emergency nursing-ENPC, CATN, CEN.

The high ED nurse-pt ratio sometimes makes it difficult to establish this relationship. I still try- I introduce myself-eye contact, shake hands, let them know I am there to help them. Sincerity, eye contact, body language are the opening tools you need to use to start this relationship. This is why good ED nurses are good "people" persons- they can't be shy or hesitant . The people you are taking care of are depending on you to keep them safe, painfree, informed about what's going on and what they can expect to happen. I also agree that there are many times that when you say "Hi- What can I do for you today?"- you get your head handed to you by your patient or their SO. Usually this occurs because of underlying issues that have been developing that have nothing to do with you (long wait times, hungry, cold, uncomfortable, alcohol or substance use or need, to name a few) The ED nurse rcognizes this and though it's difficult, remains professional and continues on....and on...and on..........

I have a different take on this...

I think because we intervene at the MOST difficult times in a person's life that a caring relationship almost HAS to develop. People are trusting their very lives and the lives of the people they love to US...

Talk about a bond...

Just my view

needsmore$

Specializes in emergency nursing-ENPC, CATN, CEN.

I like when I feel I've made a connection- that relationship feeling works both ways--When you see someone scared and in tears because they are in an ED for the first time having chest pain and by the way I take care of them, I can see them get less scared-I feel I made a diffeence. This is nursing...

talaxandra

Specializes in Medical.

kmitch, have you tried Echo Heron's books? Echo was a CCU/ER RN; she's written two books about her experiences, and compiled a collection of nurses' stories. One of the things she focuses on is this caring relationship.

Good luck!

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