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Career choice - Please Help

diniz diniz (New) New

Hi,

I am in my NP program at this time. I am torn between doing Adult/Geri and Psych NP. I like both equally. I have always done cardiology and enjoy working with the elderly thus initially I went into Adult/geri. I now feel like I am getting burnt now studying for adult/geri, there is so much information to remember and I do not want to work very long hours. I enjoyed my Psych rotation, the hours we great, the work load manageable and it was so interesting. I felt like the change was something much needed. Any opinions on which one I should pursue, I have thought about this so much, and made a pros and cons list. But I am still so confused about which one I should choose. Can someone please give me their thoughts and opinions on this matter.

Thanks

If you enjoy Pysch, then do it. When I entered NP school I thought I wanted to do family practice but when I did women's health a couple of rotations I soon feel in love. Follow your heart and you should be fine!

marty6001, EdD, EMT-P, APRN

Specializes in ER, Critical Care, Paramedicine. Has 18 years experience.

The beauty of being a nurse. Try one. If you don't like it you can always go back and get a post-doc or in some circumstances if it's in your scope of practice take a job in the other!!!

I would see if you can transition into FNP at your school. As you already know, Adult and Geri NP certification will be retired in 2014. I would go ahead and see if you can transition to get into FNP route to avoid this. It might be difficult for other school to give credits for your rotations you have completed for their FNP programs later. It will be best to complete FNP so you don't have to worry about finding "bridge program" to get FNP later.

I would do FNP first then do psych later for DNP or post-master's (if they still offer it). It's a great combination. FNP jobs are much more prevalent and common and give you flexibility of where you want to be when you get your DNP with psych cert later. It maybe more difficult to do the other way around.

Yes, there are some jobs for psych NP but it requires moving and it limits you to only one specific area of practice. It's not like you can just apply anywhere... But if you really want to limit your to psych and give up flexibility, then PMHNP.

Go with your gut. As the previous poster said, you can always change in the future. I have had the good fortune to be in many different roles over my 20 year career in nursing: staff nurse, nurse educator, and now ACNP. My next adventure will be starting my DNP in August, and I just took a full time teaching job at a local university. I'm so excited to try something new! Whatever you decide, remember that changing jobs is not really seen as a negative in nursing. I personally think it makes us all more marketable and also makes us better nurses in the long run. And when people ask why I left a job, I always say "career advancement" and explain my philosophy. I've never had a problem thus far, and it has been seen as a positive by my prospective employers. All the best with your decision!

Hi,

I am in my NP program at this time. I am torn between doing Adult/Geri and Psych NP. I like both equally. I have always done cardiology and enjoy working with the elderly thus initially I went into Adult/geri. I now feel like I am getting burnt now studying for adult/geri, there is so much information to remember and I do not want to work very long hours. I enjoyed my Psych rotation, the hours we great, the work load manageable and it was so interesting. I felt like the change was something much needed. Any opinions on which one I should pursue, I have thought about this so much, and made a pros and cons list. But I am still so confused about which one I should choose. Can someone please give me their thoughts and opinions on this matter.

Thanks

I agree with the suggestion about getting your FNP then a post master's in psych...as a matter of fact, that's my own plan! Good luck in your decision.

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