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BSN vs AAS Nursing

ADN/BSN   (3,767 Views | 1 Replies)
by RyanCW RyanCW (New) New

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Hello,

I am hoping to pursuit sometype of a degree in order to become an RN. However, I am clueless as to what type of degree I should get. The two that I see most are the BSN for 3-4 years, or an AAS for 2 years.

What do you recommend?

Is there a difference in pay?

Can I become an RN with either of these degrees?

And any other help you can give I would really appreciate it!

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PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

5,144 Posts; 69,569 Profile Views

Hello,

I am hoping to pursuit some type of a degree in order to become an RN. However, I am clueless as to what type of degree I should get. The two that I see most are the BSN for 3-4 years, or an AAS for 2 years.

What do you recommend?

Is there a difference in pay?

Can I become an RN with either of these degrees?

And any other help you can give I would really appreciate it!

*** Yes either degree will make you elligable to sit the RN NCLEX and earn an RN license and work as a RN. There is no difference between them in the license. They have exactly the same scope of practice and do exactly the same jobs. In most areas there is no difference in pay. In some areas there is a very small increase in pay for nurses who have a BSN. Couple things you should consider. The AAS in nursing will likely take at least 3 year rather than the advertised 2. Usually there are pre-reqs that must be completed before one can apply tot he two year nursing program. This is not true in all areas, for example here in Wisconsin the associates degree in nursing can (and is) be done in two years start to finish. You should look at the website of the schools you are considering. In addition in many associates degree programs there are waiting lists. The upside is that you eventually WILL get in, though you may have to wait. BSN programs are usually do not have waiting lists and admissions are competitive. If you get in you get in right away but if you don't then no nursing school for you, at least not that year.

Another thing to consider is that currently many hospitals prefer to hire BSN grads rather than associates degree grads. There are a few exceptions I know of but it is a trend that they prefer to hire nurses with BSNs. This is far less true for highly skilled and experienced nurses but much more true for new grads. In todays tight job market you might put yourself at a disadvantage with an associates degree. How much a disadvantage (if any) is highly dependent on the area where you want to work. I would suggest visiting some of the hospital web sites where you might want to work and see if they say "BSN preferred or required" before you decide.

My advice is to apply to both programs and if given the option go for the BSN, though I very much doubt you could get it done in 3 years unless you already have college credits.

Good luck and if you have and more questions just ask!

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