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BSN to FNP or DNP or NNP or Nursing Education or Public Health

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Specializes in Newborn RNC-MNN. Has 11 years experience.

Hello All,

I have my BSN and RNC MNN, I have worked as a RN for the past 10 years. Nursery (7 years) Mother Baby (3 years). I am interested in the following graduate school programs however, I'm having difficulty choosing. These are the thoughts on my mind. I would love and appreciate all help and feedback.

What are the main benefits and differences of ARNP versus DNP? (career options, cost of school, length of school )

NNP Neonatal Nurse Practitioner - I do not have NICU experience, however I work in a level 1B nursery. (TTN, hypoglycemia, sepsis, IV fluids, antibiotics, and oxygen up to 40%) Will this expierence qualify for entry into the NNP program or is NICU mandatory.

Nursing Education- Is this salary competitive, do bedside RN's make more? I have co workers who teach clinical but maintain their job as a bedside nurse.

Public Health- I loved working on medical missions in underprivileged countries. I am extremely passionate in providing care to those who lack resources. I enjoy helping communities in need. What careers are in Public Health degrees?

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

ARNP vs DNP: The DNP is an academic degree -- awarded by a school when you complete their academic program. The ARNP is a role, and type of nursing license that allows you to practice as a Nurse Practitioner. It's very similar to what happens when a new nurse graduates from college. She gets a BSN (or whatever) from the school that qualifies her to take the NCLEX that gets her a license from state to practice as a registered nurse (RN).

To get into a good NNP school, you'll probably need actual NICU experience. There is a world of difference between a 1B nursery an a Level III or IV NICU. But if you look hard enough, you might find some sort of program that focuses on well babies or those with only mild problems -- but I doubt it would fall under the NNP designation.

Your Nursing Education question is complicated -- because there is so much variety in the types of jobs available in that field. At the higher levels of education (with a DNP, PhD, or EdD), the compensation for educators/researchers/scholars can be quite good. However, climbing that high on the academic career ladder is a hard road, with lots of requirements. A beginner level instructor teaching undergrads makes a lot less -- less than a lot of hospital positions.

Within education, there are also jobs working for hospitals that sometimes pay more than working for a nursing school. Staff development educators often have nice schedules and working conditions, even though they make a little less than NP's, CNS's, managers, etc.

That's been my experience. I have a PhD and work in a hospital in the Nursing Professional Development Department.

RN12345, BSN

Specializes in Newborn RNC-MNN. Has 11 years experience.

Thank you for taking the time to leave a response. I really appreciate it. Do you think ARNP's need to continue their education and obtain DNP. Is a Masters degree ARNP sufficient?

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

It depends on where you live ... what the norms are for your community ... what the job market is like there ... what your age is ... what your career plans and hopes are. There is no one answer for that question.

If you live in a community where the DNP is common and is the credential preferred by local employers, then yes, you will probably need to get one if you would like your choice of jobs and plan to work for several more years. However, if you work in a community in which almost no one has a DNP and only have 10 years left in your career, then it probably wouldn't be necessary. Most people find themselves somewhere in between those 2 extreme possible scenarios.

Numenor, BSN, MSN, NP

Specializes in Internal Medicine. Has 9 years experience.

On 4/28/2020 at 2:13 PM, RN12345 said:

Thank you for taking the time to leave a response. I really appreciate it. Do you think ARNP's need to continue their education and obtain DNP. Is a Masters degree ARNP sufficient?

In my experience, a masters is sufficient. the DNP is touted by the nursing education community but in reality hospitals value experience over everything. The MDs I work with have 0 idea there even different NP specialties. Do you think they care about MSN vs DNP?

I personally don't see the DNP in my future, I can't justify the cost vs little clinical gain. A quick look at the curriculum confirms that.

Your lack of NICU experience probably wouldn't qualify you for most NPP programs and if one did accept you I would think that program is suspect. It's too niche to not have a solid background.

Edited by Numenor

RN12345, BSN

Specializes in Newborn RNC-MNN. Has 11 years experience.

Thank you all, for your responses. I have been accepted into a FNP MSN 2 year program (2 additional years if I go back for DNP). I have also interviewed for a FNP BSN to DNP program that is 4.5 years. I am a bit torn between these two options.