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chilll92 chilll92 (New Member) New Member

Best department for CNA 2?

CNA/MA   (829 Views 6 Comments)
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Hey everyone,

I'm starting a CNA 2 class soon and I'm getting pretty excited about it. I can't wait to be able to work in a hospital and have more options than skilled nursing facilities. Not to mention a larger scope of practice and all of the experience it will give me before becoming an RN. When I look at job postings there are positions being posted daily and they're all in different departments. Of course, when I do clinicals I will get to learn in different departments but just for fun, which one would be your first pick as a CNA? I definitely don't mind ambulating, bed baths, etc., but I'd like to be somewhere where that isn't ALL that I'm doing. Obstetrics seems interesting to me, and I know someone who works in cardiopulmonary and likes it there (says it is way better than a SNF), but I'm just curious and would like to hear some more feedback. Let me know what y'all think!

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What in the world is a CNA 2? Is it something just for your state, or why are you taking a CNA 2 class?

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So quick google search and there are a handful of states that require a CNA 2 license, which most of the websites stress that a CNA 1 takes orders from a nurse. No mention of a CNA 2 taking orders from a nurse, but a CNA 2 can oversee a CNA 1?

What kind of witchcraft is this? It's still all under the nurse's license, am I correct?

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Haha yes basically Oregon just requires an extra 60 hours of classroom time and then I think like 24 hours or something of clinicals in order to work in a hospital setting. I won't be overseeing CNA 1s because they can't work in a hospital and they don't hire CNA 2s in LTCs. In the words of my instructor, it's just a waste of time and money in order to jump through another hoop that the Oregon Board of Nursing created. But worth said time and money in order to make a few more dollars per hour and have a few more options as to where we can work.

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I think it's great that you are going to work in a hospital, even if you have to get another certification. I work overtime on different floors at a level I university trauma center, and I can break down some specialties for you.

Any ICU and you're going to have a lot of movement of patients to scans and turn Q2 hours. Progressive care/Telemetry is similar, although you can have some walkie-talkies. Vital signs are more frequent in ICU/PCU, but because they are on a cardiac monitor you'll have to get temperatures and check the blood pressure for your nurse. Acute care requires less vital signs, but you will have to manually obtain as often as ordered.

Neurology: A lot of fluff and puff's. Turn Q2 hours, restraints, incontinence. Depending on the stroke, they can be impulsive, believing they can walk when they can't. This leads to restraints and a lot of bed alarms.

Neurosurgery: Similar to Neurology, but these patients might be able to walk or jump out of bed without part of their skull, leading to more bed alarms and restraints (if they fall and hit their head without a bone flap on, they will die). Spinal surgeries do walk, and need help out of bed. You'll have some crazies too.

Trauma: These patients are in pain. Lots of pain. Turn Q2, need assistance and help ambulating, getting to the bathroom, getting on a bedpan. They usually are continent.

Cardiac: Daily weights, walkie talkies, usually can ambulate to bathroom without assistance. May have strict I's and O's with fluid restrictions. Some do laps on the floor like they are mall walkers. Some IV drug users with endocarditis

Medicine: These patients are sick. They have tubes, drains, and dialysis. More IV drug users than the other floors.

Hospice/Palliative: Dying. Less turning and usually only one set of vital signs per shift. More attention for family including fetching drinks, pillows, blankets, and other basic needs. Expect postmortem care.

Hope that helps with your decision. Best of luck in your future endeavors!

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They just started this in my state this year but under a different name you still take orders from the nurse and you will be able to work in a hospital right way. In addition, we also have another CNA class to review the things we've learned. It's just a great way for them to make money. I'm still debating if I would take these classes or not because I might quit being a CNA .

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