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Avoiding Antibiotic Resistance: What to Tell Your Patients

Nurses Article   (2,158 Views 13 Comments 1,164 Words)

Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN has 6 years experience and works as a Wellness Coach, Clinical Nursing Instructor.

39 Likes; 6 Followers; 24 Articles; 9,704 Visitors; 128 Posts

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What are you teaching your patients about antibiotic resistance? How do you deal with patients who are dissatisfied with their care because they expected to receive a prescription for an antibiotic… and didn’t? You are reading page 2 of Avoiding Antibiotic Resistance: What to Tell Your Patients. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN has 6 years experience and works as a Wellness Coach, Clinical Nursing Instructor.

39 Likes; 6 Followers; 24 Articles; 9,704 Visitors; 128 Posts

The thing is, WE providers created this and other problems. WE made patients "customers" who behave toward health care providers like toward waitressing staff in quick order diner. Now, of course, we are not happy with it, but now it is again up to us to change it, and that will be WAY more difficult.

With patients I have developed trust, I do not throw scripts. I spend quite more time (which greatly reduces my "productivity") to explain them that sneezing in cold weather is normal, for one example. Sometimes I even give them script for Zpack and tell not to fill it till if they do not get better in 3 to 4 days. They accept it because they trust me to begin with.

You are absolutely right that we as providers need to take a long hard look at ourselves in the mirror and ask how we are contributing to the problem. One of my nursing instructors was fond of reminding students and patients alike that, "This is a hospital, not the Holiday Inn." We can translate the spirit of that idea into any healthcare setting by empowering our patients more, not less. Just like what you're doing by building trust and writing a prescription that your properly-educated patient can choose to fill or not. Good for you. Good for your patients. And ultimately good for everyone.

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