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Assistant to Nurse Manager in 2 weeks

Management   (614 Views | 1 Replies)
by VW91 VW91, BSN (New) New

VW91 is a BSN and specializes in Tele.

47 Profile Views; 1 Post

Speaking with my leadership. There is going to be a restructuring and I will be taking over the “problem unit.” She will be overseeing both a new manager and myself over my current unit and this problem unit.. 

I am excited about this new challenge  however am being told to have a plan to take over this unit within two weeks. TWO WEEKS. It’s a little overwhelming since this unit had been closed down with low census due to COVID 19. This unit is known to have issues with the staff being rogue and not being held accountable. I am up for the challenge but also part of me is sad since I have built up my current team for the past 3 years.

My brain hurts just thinking of all the work I need to do as well as how I place myself over this new unit and new staff.

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SummerGarden has 12 years experience as a ADN, BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in ED, ICU, MS/MT, PCU, CM, House Sup, Frontline mgr.

3,072 Posts; 37,292 Profile Views

Well, these are unique times.  Many of my colleagues and I are in your same shoes.  Some within my facility have been ANMs for many years and are being given opportunities for promotions shortly as nurse managers.  Others with less work experience as ANMs, but who show potential,  are being given more responsibilities that could lead to a promotion someday. 

I think it is natural to be nervous and sad to move to a different team no matter the circumstances.  I also think it is natural to be nervous about additional responsibilities to support your facility.  However, I believe that so long as you are being given the correct supports, you will do fine!  🙂 

By the way, as an ANM who has gone to multiple facilities and worked with multiple teams over the past several years, I think and I have been told that it is better for ANMs and department managers to have a diverse background in the clinical setting.  It does not look good to some to be in one spot for too long.  Being very good at one department or working with one team only tells you and others you an handle one thing well over time.   It does not tell people (hiring managers) that you can manage unfamiliar work environments because you are a good leader who is a quick learner, flexible, open, etc.  So, this is a very good thing to be happening for you and your career.  My advise is to tap into your network of mentors.  You are not alone!  Good luck! 🙂 

Edited by SummerGarden

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