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AL3Xxs AL3Xxs (New Member) New Member

Advice would be appreciated :)

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You are reading page 2 of Advice would be appreciated :). If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

As someone currently in nursing school, I want to speak on this. 

When I was in A&P 1 in my pre-reqs, I met a girl who was DYING to be a nurse. She wanted into our program so badly. I'd study after class with her for usually an hour or two after every class. She made flashcards, quizlets, bought anatomy coloring books, the works. She did everything she could. 

And she couldn't pass. She ended up with a 1.8 GPA, which simply isn't good enough in our school, or most schools. I got wait listed in my program with even a 4.0 in anatomy and chem (however, it looks like I was the 2nd person on the wait list).

Point being, could you find a school that would accept you if you worked your butt off? Maybe. But nursing classes are much, much harder than anything we had to do in any of the pre-reqs. I mean this in the kindest of ways, but if you've already failed those particular courses three times, it may be best to look into a different field. It can't happen for everyone.  

Edited by falconersys
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On 1/21/2019 at 12:30 AM, falconersys said:

But nursing classes are much, much harder than anything we had to do in any of the pre-reqs. I mean this in the kindest of ways, but if you've already failed those particular courses three times, it may be best to look into a different field. It can't happen for everyone.  

That's not necessarily true.  So far for me, nursing classes are way easier than my A&Ps were.  For people who learn by application, nursing school is pretty much tailored to them.  Every new thing you learn, you tend to focus on why instead of what.  People who learn that way have a huge advantage.  Everything you learn you pretty much immediately apply to what you already know.  So when you learn about a new disease, once you know how it affects you, you should already have a general idea of most of the symptoms and exactly how you're going to care for the patient.  You're really just only learning what makes that one unique. 

There's 2 kinds of students: There's the ones that can learn and memorize every symptom of 5 different GI infections inside and out and be able to plan care around every one of them (which is impressive), and then there's the ones that associate GI infection = diarrhea or puking depending on where it infects, and then that causes almost every other symptom.  So instead of focusing one a list of symptoms, you're instead focused on what's different between an E. Coli infection and a Salmonella infection.

Edited by tonyl1234

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