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Adult NP or FNP?? Any Opinions??

NP Students   (57,822 Views | 32 Replies)
by Gville RN Gville RN (New) New

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Reeya, can I ask what school you are at? I am thinking about transfering from the school I am in.

Does anyone know of any really good online programs that don't cost an arm and a leg? I've been looking into Georgetown but they are so terribly expensive, I'm not sure I can justify the cost. If I was in my 20's or 30's I would definitely consider them. However, I am an older (50's) student and don't think I want to go into 70 thousand dollars worth of debt at this point!

Anyone out there in an online FNP program they REALLY like, please let me know.

Thanks!

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juan de la cruz has 27 years experience as a MSN, RN, NP and specializes in APRN, Adult Critical Care.

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I'm confused because this is listed on their FAQ page. So are they getting rid of ACNPs or not? This is what I found on their site.

10. What will the new certifications be and when will they launch?

As a result of the APRN Consensus Model implementation in 2015, ANCC will be creating new certifications to meet the role and/or population foci requirements. Planning for these certifications is under way, and we are pleased to announce the expected launch of:

  • Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner [expected launch 2013]
  • Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner [expected launch 2013]
  • Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist (across the continuum from wellness through acute care)[expected launch 2014]

11. Which certifications will be retired and when?

The certifications listed below will be retired when their current National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA) accreditation period expires in 2014. Retiring certifications are:

  • Acute Care Nurse Practitioner
  • Adult Nurse Practitioner
  • Adult Psychiatric & Mental Health Nurse Practitioner
  • Gerontological Nurse Practitioner
  • Adult Health Clinical Nurse Specialist
  • Adult Psychiatric & Mental Health Clinical Nurse Specialist
  • Child/Adolescent Psychiatric & Mental Health Clinical Nurse Specialist
  • Gerontological Clinical Nurse Specialist

I'm thoroughly confused now.

They are not getting rid of the the acute care tracks. The Consensus Model streamlined the NP specialties by dissolving the Gerontological NP track and incorporating it into the adult tracks as either Adult and Gerontology Primary Care or Adult and Gerontology Acute Care. This change only affects the NP tracks that deal with the adult population. The Family, Peds, and Women's Health tracks are not affected. Psych is affected because the Adult and Peds which used to be separate will be combined as one - Family Psych.

If you are currently enrolled in an Adult Acute Care or Adult Primary Care track, you should check with your program director to see what changes are being planned in order to incorporate the Gerontology content in your program so that you can meet the new certification requirements being launched by ANCC for target implementation year of 2013. I know the school I attended for my ACNP currently imposed an admission moratorium for their ACNP and ANP program while they reorganize the curriculum. Some schools already have a combined Adult and Gerontology curriculum in their ACNP and ANP programs so those programs should be fine with the new changes. My program didn't have a formal Gerontology content but we all know that majority of patients admitted in adult wards of hospitals are above the age of 65.

As far as I'm concerned, I would still recommend doing an Acute Care track if that's where your interest lies. It is a good preparation for in-patient roles. But if given a choice between ANP (primary care) and FNP, I would easily pick FNP, but again, that's just my opinion.

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SHGR is a MSN, RN, CNS and specializes in nursing education.

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I am really glad that I read this thread and then the concensus paper that is referenced, since this is an issue that I struggled with as well- applied and was accepted to an FNP and an adult NP program, and ultimately chose the adult, starting spring of 2012- still wonder a tiny bit if I've made the right decision.

Thanks for the advice because I did go back and check and the program at the university where I'll be attending is now called Adult-Gerontological, which means that I would be eligible to sit for that NP exam in 2013- assuming everything goes according to plan.

Part of my rationale is based on that, where I work, our FNP can only see up to age 65. That excludes a lot of people. Geriatrics is going to continue to be a high-need area- and I think this direction of the licensure really makes a lot of sense.

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nomadcrna has 30 years experience as a CRNA, NP and specializes in Anesthesia, Pain, Emergency Medicine.

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I'm not sure why that is the case. That is facility specific as the FNP can see any age across the life span.

If i were an FNP, I would demand to practice at my full scope or I would leave.

Once again, that is NOT the licensure but your facility.

I am really glad that I read this thread and then the concensus paper that is referenced, since this is an issue that I struggled with as well- applied and was accepted to an FNP and an adult NP program, and ultimately chose the adult, starting spring of 2012- still wonder a tiny bit if I've made the right decision.

Thanks for the advice because I did go back and check and the program at the university where I'll be attending is now called Adult-Gerontological, which means that I would be eligible to sit for that NP exam in 2013- assuming everything goes according to plan.

Part of my rationale is based on that, where I work, our FNP can only see up to age 65. That excludes a lot of people. Geriatrics is going to continue to be a high-need area- and I think this direction of the licensure really makes a lot of sense.

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SHGR is a MSN, RN, CNS and specializes in nursing education.

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I'm not sure why that is the case. That is facility specific as the FNP can see any age across the life span.

I was aware that this was our facility policy, and for reasons that make sense to me, but I guess I thought it was a common policy.

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

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Agree with nomadcrna: this limits your scope of practice - who take scare of those over age 65?

In a few years there won't be just a gerontological or just an adult NP - so it will be this new NP?

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SHGR is a MSN, RN, CNS and specializes in nursing education.

2 Articles; 1,406 Posts; 31,416 Profile Views

In a few years there won't be just a gerontological or just an adult NP - so it will be this new NP?

There will be a combined adult-gerontological NP.

Those over 65 are handled by MD's and DO's where I work- no midlevels.

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

165 Articles; 21,045 Posts; 192,988 Profile Views

Wow! May I ask what kind of place you work? Clinic? Hospital? Something else?

I'm an adult CNS (title soon to be retired also) as well as a Peds CNS and I see everyone - I work in nephrology.

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nomadcrna has 30 years experience as a CRNA, NP and specializes in Anesthesia, Pain, Emergency Medicine.

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I do not provide mid level care and consider the term midlevel to be derogatory.

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

165 Articles; 21,045 Posts; 192,988 Profile Views

Nomadcrna - I politely request that you stay on target.

Most of us (myself included) are not offended by being called a midlevel practitioner.

It sure beats physician extender - which sounds just nasty to me. (See - we all have our biases).

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SHGR is a MSN, RN, CNS and specializes in nursing education.

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I work in a Family Medicine clinic.

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SHGR is a MSN, RN, CNS and specializes in nursing education.

2 Articles; 1,406 Posts; 31,416 Profile Views

Most of us (myself included) are not offended by being called a midlevel practitioner.

It sure beats physician extender - which sounds just nasty to me. (See - we all have our biases).

I don't think it's intended to be a derogatory term, and I don't consider it to be one either. The philosophy and history behind NP's is pretty awesome, actually, and I'm behind it 100%. I can't wait to provide competent, cost-effective primary care. :)

The dilemma, for me, is that I don't really feel comfortable around kids- little kids I mean- and imagining myself trying to figure things out about - and being responsible for!- a little tiny person that can't articulate what hurts is totally scary. Of course elderly people with dementia could be in the same boat, or a person in his or her 20's with a developmental delay, or heck one of our low educational/T19 patients...I do phone triage and just being honest here...maybe I should just do the FNP after all!!!

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